jump to example.com
Currently viewing the tag: "Timberline"

Whether you want to build a unique storage case for your coin collection or find a classy way to mark the year you built your woodworking project, you’ll be hard pressed to find the right-sized bit in a regular Forstner bit set. What you need is a coin-sized Forstner bit set.

There may be sets for other countries’ coins out there, but we’ll talk about sets that have bits for the 6 sizes of U.S. coins. The bits for the U.S. coin sizes are more or less as follows:

  • Pennies: 19.1 mm or 0.751″
  • Nickles: 21.3mm or .839″
  • Dimes: 18mm or .709″
  • Quarters:  24.1mm or .949″
  • Half Dollars: 30.6mm or  1.205″
  • Dollars: 26.6mm or 1.047″

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Counter-sinking seems to be all the rage, but where’s the love for counter-bores? You can find no end to counter-sinking bits sold online, yet for some reason the options for counter-bores is severely limited.

A counter-sink is a conical hole that lets a tapered screw head sink below the surface so it’s flush with the surface or slightly recessed. A counter-bore is a cylindrical hole with a flat bottom. It also allows the head of a bolt or screw to be flush with the surface or recessed.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

If you’ve ever worked plastic with woodworking tools, you’ve probably noticed that the chips usually melt to the side of the cut, or chip welding as it’s commonly called. Not only does cleaning it up add more work, but you don’t get a nice crisp edge.

I discovered that several of the blades designed to cut plastic without melting all seem to have the same features: They use a modified triple chip grind and the carbide teeth have a -2º hook angle. It turns out this is not a coincidence. Both the moderately priced A.G.E. and the inexpensive Timberline brands are also made by Amana Tool.

Continue reading »

Tagged with: