jump to example.com
Currently viewing the tag: "Saws"

At first glance, the BladeRunner seems to be a corporatized version of mounting a jigsaw upside-down in a table. Heck, even the second and third glances still give that impression.

The product video on the website further tarnishes the image with its cheesy infomercial feel, especially the part with the BladeRunner doing the jobs of at least five other tools that would normally cost you $500 or more to buy. The fact you can pay for it in four easy payments of $40 doesn’t help the image of an “As Seen On TV” product. Not to disappoint, they even offer to throw in the wall mount, a $40 value, absolutely free.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

With the pervasiveness of table and miter saws, even in the hobbyist’s workshop, the trusty old handsaw doesn’t see as much use as when it was a staple. Still, most shops have one or two handsaws about, but since they’ve gone from the starting lineup to the minors, they’ll rarely ever be sharpened.

For the shop that still uses a handsaw regularly, it’ll need to be sharpened once in a while. When that time comes, do you just buy a new one, or take a few minutes to sharpen it yourself? With a file, patience, and practice you could probably do an okay job, but you’d more than likely be better off buying a proper saw sharpener like the Eclipse 38 from Spear & Jackson.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

These wicked looking objects are actually 7-1/4″ saw blades from Smartman Tools. Used for roofing repairs, they’re designed to cut through roof decking — shingles and all. Presumably because of their unique design, Smartman Tools claim they last longer than their competition’s blades.

Designed for cutting through three layers of shingles or tar and gravel roofs, the three winged 3x RipBlade can cut over 7500 linear feet without clogging. Under a little less harsh conditions, say only two layers of shingles, you might want to switch to the five winged 5x RipBlade which goes a little longer without clogging. Both blades can be resharpened.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

It may not happen often, but sometimes you need to make a cut flush with the edge of your saw — you might be in a tight space or there’s some obstruction in the way preventing you from completing the cut. This is no problem with a hand saw, but it’s almost impossible with a tool like a jigsaw where the blade can be over an inch away from the edge of the shoe. That’s where a flush cut blade like DeWalt’s DW3311 comes in handy.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

The 10″ Micro Kerf Blade is a carbide-tipped, 40-tooth blade meant for both rips and crosscuts. Total Saw Solutions claims the saw kerf is half that of a standard thin-kerf blade, as thin as the width of a dime. This is one finely machined blade — the plate is precision ground and tensioned so that runout is less that 1/2 the thickness of a human hair.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Ever use your table saw while wearing a flannel shirt? You’d think you wouldn’t make that mistake more than once. Most table saws dust collection systems capture dust generated below the workpiece, but do a poor job capturing the dust that the blade throws above the work piece — usually right at your shirt.

What we need is a way to capture the dust that comes off the top of the workpiece. Blade guard dust collection systems are nothing new, but they’re usually priced at a good percentage of what you paid for your table saw. This blade guard dust collector from Penn State Industries looks to be a solution that the home wood worker might afford.

Continue reading »

Forget cutting your sticks one piece at a time; with a little bit of help from an A-daptor kit*, you can turn your Skil or Bosch 7-1/4″ worm drive saw into a 10-1/4″ saw that can take a big 3-3/4″ bite out of your stock — enough to gang cut a mess of 2x4s.

Big Foot Tools sells kits that fit Skil Type 14,15,16, and 17 saws, the Bosch 1677M, and the Mag Type  1. Their adapter kit ships complete with a 10-1/4″, 36-tooth carbide blade. Using the supplied instructions it supposedly only takes 15-30 minutes to convert your saw.

You’ll pay about $300 for the kit.

*(Thanks to the Man in Black for this great song)

Saw Adapter Kit [Big Foot Tools]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

Tagged with:
 

It may go against your initial thinking, but sometimes you actually need to make cracks bigger to properly fill them. Crack chasing blades like the one pictured allow you to widen cracks in concrete and asphalt and taper the edges so you can fill them properly.

MK Diamond designed their V-segment MK-404DV crack chaser for dry cutting. Available in 4″, 4-1/4″, 5″, 7″, and 8″ sizes, these blades can be used in angle grinders with standard threaded or non-threaded arbors depending on the blade model. They run anywhere from $200 to $300 depending on the size.

Crack Chaser [MK Diamond]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

Tagged with:
 

Two dado blade types dominate the industry.  Wobble dado blades are simple one-piece blades where you adjust the width by making it wobble more or less — unfortunately this leaves the bottom of the dado slightly concave.  Stacked dado blades include blades, chippers, and shims which you add or subtract to get the correct width.  These type leave a flatter bottom, but are usually more expensive and can be difficult to adjust.

Freud tries to combine the advantages of both types of dado blades with its Dial-A-Width sets. The sets are in essence a stacked dado blade without the shims.  Instead Freud uses a patented dial hub that adjusts the blade width by .004″ with every click.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Though a good bow saw comes in handy around the yard and camp, you don’t always want to carry around a full-size version. Irwin makes this little 12″ bow saw that looks like it’d be easy to pack and still useful around camp.  And it also accepts standard hacksaw blades — that’s one useful tool.

Continue reading »

Tagged with: