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Maybe you aren’t going to reach speeds of 40 MPH on these Marshalltown knee boards, but at least you won’t sink into the concrete while you’re shuffling along at 0.04 MPH.

Strap into the kneepads, lock your toes into the toe brackets, and you’re ready to work some concrete. The knee boards are made from 18 gauge stainless steel so they won’t turn into rust from contact with wet concrete all day. When the knee pads finally give out, you can replace them without having to buy a whole new pair of knee boards.

Pricing for Marshalltown’s KB230 knee boards start around $110.

Knee Boards [Marshalltown]
Street Pricing [Google]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

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We’ve seen golden axes, golden shovels, and golden scissors for ceremonial purposes, but how about a gold ceremonial trowel? I’ve never seen one used, but if I had to guess, it might be for laying the first or last brick in a project.

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If you only need a hammer drill occasionally, perhaps you could get by with this Mastercraft hammer drill adapter. After chucking the adapter into your drill, you activate the hammering action by holding onto the adapter while you operate the drill.

The adapter requires a drill with at least a 3/8″ chuck. If you want to use the adapter with a cordless drill it should probably be a 12V or higher model. Canadian Tire retails this hammer drill adapter for $25. And for some reason, Duluth Trading Company charges $35 for their seemingly identical version.

Hammer Drill Adapter [Canadian Tire]
Hammer Drill Adapter [Duluth Trading Company]

Metabo’s Wall Chaser MFE 30 is a specialty tool for cutting grooves or chases in masonry or concrete.  The tool saves time by cutting both sides of the groove at once. Then all you need to do is chisel out the middle with the supplied extraction chisel.

Two 4-7/8″ diameter diamond cutting disks allow you to cut grooves 3/8″, 5/8″, 7/8″, or 1-1/8″ wide and up to 1-1/8″ deep, or you can just use one blade for other cutting chores. A dust port connects to common-sized suction hoses to keep the dust down.

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In the recent post Tool Pr0n: Would You Pay $280 For A Brace?, reader PutnamEco mentioned Protool — a company that sells tools in Australia, but not in the U.S. Seems like our friends down-under see a lot of tools we don’t here in the states. One product they sell which you won’t see anytime soon is their unique ProJet mixing system which looks more like a modern art project than a mixer.

Supposedly the ProJet mixing rods use the same principle as jet engine turbines. Three cones create an intense flow without introducing air into the mixture, which allows you to quickly and completely mix most materials without foaming.

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