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The next series of steps in rebuilding the Eaton M90 requires some new parts and careful disassembly. An arbor press is a must for this stage. Once the snout’s removed, it needs to be disassembled. There are two bearings, a seal, a spring, and the drive shaft inside, all of which need to be removed without damaging the snout. Only two snout parts carry over from the old to the rebuilt blower: the drive shaft, and the press-on, three-stud coupler.

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Once you’ve sourced an M90, the next step is rebuilding it. For better or worse, most of the motors paired with the M90 were fantastically durable, which means high miles on the blower. At the very least, the snout should be rebuilt. While there are different lengths available depending on the original application, they all use the same seals, bearings, and coupler, which are the snout parts that should be replaced. I’ll frequently reference the photo above, which comes from an ongoing project by user NVA-AV6 at V6Performance.net, and there’s a high-resolution version for easier viewing.

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I recently rebuilt an Eaton M90 supercharger for a project engine, and a reader suggested I chronicle the process. For starters, I found lots of good information online but ran into a few problems that no one seemed to mention. Sources like Rolling Performance and Thunderbird Infoway served me well for both details and parts, but I’ve since located an even better source for rebuilt kits. More on that later.

The first thing you need to do is locate the supercharger itself. Mine was a decent eBay find selected more for the $90 price tag than for apparent quality. It’s in decent shape, but 170,000 miles is hard on any component. New or freshly-rebuilt M90s cost anywhere from $300 to $600, usually with a core charge tacked on if you don’t have an old blower.

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