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A few weeks ago I posted a neat, yet overly expensive solution for collecting dust from under the router table. It turns out I overlooked a cheaper solution if you have a Rockler or JessEm router plate or lift.

The Rockler Down Under Router Table Dust Port simply twists and locks into the bottom of their new Inter-Loc router plate inserts — no tools required. If you’re not using a lift, it’ll fit through the opening of most router bases.

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The old furnace-filter-in-front-of-a-box-fan trick is well known, but it has its downsides. If you don’t attach the filter to the box, it’ll fall off when you shut off the fan. Also, air leaks around the filter, making it less effective. You can build your own shroud to fix these problems, but if you don’t have the time you can buy the Filter-A-Fan.

The Filter-A-Fan fits LASKO model #3733 and GALAXY model #4733 fans. Just remove the screws that hold on the guard and use those screws to hold the Filter-A-Fan in place. The Filter-A-Fan shroud runs $35 by itself, or you can buy it with a fan for $60 before shipping. You’ll have to supply your own 16″ x 16″ filter.

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Most router tables allow you to capture dust and chips from the top of the table through a collection port on the fence, but this is only effective for some operations. Other operations require dust collection from the bottom of the table. There are a few different methods to do this with varying levels of effectiveness; usually they involve encasing the router in some sort of vacuum box.

Keen Products’ dust collection system collects dust right from the point of entry on the bottom of the table, leaving your router accessible and open so it won’t overheat. It also removes most of the dust before it has a chance to fall into the router motor, hopefully prolonging its life.

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If you own a shop-vac and don’t want to pay for a pricey two-stage dust collector, you have many options. There are plenty of DIY instructions for building your own, covers that you can add to a 5-gallon pail, or full-blown dust collection systems ready to hook up to your shop-vac. The latest addition to this last category is Rockler’s Dust Right Vortex dust separator.

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Although dust collection in bench top and contractor saws has gotten much better as of late, it still leaves much to be desired. No matter how good the dust collection is, the open bottom still leaves an escape route for sawdust. Fortunately the Dust Cutter will catch much of this errant dust rather than let it escape into the air or drop to the floor.

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Since we’ve seen Bosch ramp up dust collection on their rotary hammers, you’d expect other manufacturers to be following suit. Recently, Dewalt introduced their D25301D-XJ Dust Extraction Telescope for their corded and cordless SDS rotary hammers.

Adding only 1.4 lbs. to your rotary hammer, the Dust Extractor can be used to drill dust-free holes up to 16 mm (5/8″) in diameter and 150 mm (~6″) deep. It’s easy to assemble and remove without tools and comes with with a 150 cm (5′) long, 35 mm (1-3/8″) diameter rubber hose and a side handle.

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What’s better than a rotary hammer to power through hardened concrete? How about one that cleans up after itself? Enter Bosch’s 11250VSRD rotary hammer with dust collection system.

The dust collection head telescopes as far as 5″ from the tool to keep it at the point of penetration. The dust collection unit uses a replaceable microfilter to provide “dust free drilling.” With the addition of the dust collection system, the total package weight just 7.4 lbs.

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Ever use your table saw while wearing a flannel shirt? You’d think you wouldn’t make that mistake more than once. Most table saws dust collection systems capture dust generated below the workpiece, but do a poor job capturing the dust that the blade throws above the work piece — usually right at your shirt.

What we need is a way to capture the dust that comes off the top of the workpiece. Blade guard dust collection systems are nothing new, but they’re usually priced at a good percentage of what you paid for your table saw. This blade guard dust collector from Penn State Industries looks to be a solution that the home wood worker might afford.

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Unless you have a fully-enclosed router table, your chip and dust collection probably leaves something to be desired. Instead of fully enclosing the entire table, Rockler’s Dust Bucket just encloses the router to get the same level of dust collection. When used in conjunction with a fence collection port, the Dust Bucket will allow you to collect virtually all the dust from your table.

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The smarter we become, the more we realize that wood dust and other airborne pollution isn’t very healthy for us to inhale — not to mention the how pissed off the homeowner becomes when there’s a thick layer of sawdust or drywall dust over everything in the house. For your shop you can install permanent air cleaners, but are you going to drag them with you to every job site?

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