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Bessey’s clamp extenders let you use a small clamp to do large jobs. They made the extenders to be used in conjunction with their DuoKlamps, but they should work with just about any clamp larger than 6″. The extenders can be used to clamp workpieces up to 65″ with 260 lbs. of force, or you can reverse the jaws to spread up to 70″.

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Pipe clamps aren’t the optimal clamp to use for glue-ups, but they are cheap. You can usually buy three or more pipe clamps for the price of one parallel jaw clamp. Plus, they’re very versatile — you’re only limited by the length of threaded black pipe you have on hand. Some of their downsides are the jaws don’t always stay parallel and the workpiece can buckle if you’re not careful to support both faces.

Pony’s double pipe design attempts to remedy these shortcomings by using two pipes instead of one. The clamps straddle the glued panel, keeping it flat. The pipes are spaced wide enough apart to accommodate stock up to 3″ thick.

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Several different clamps exist for holding a pocket hole joint together while driving the screws, but they either require you to clamp the workpiece to the table or are large and unwieldly vice-grip like contraptions. Rockler’s new Pock-It Hole clamp is a small, low-profile clamp that only attaches to the workpiece.

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Constant-tension hose clamps are fast becoming ubiquitous on mass-produced cars, courtesy of their stone-cold reliability and automatic adjustment. Worm gear and T-bolt hose clamps should be re-torqued after installation with the hoses hot, since the clamping force squeezes rubber out from underneath the band (a tendency called cold creep), but constant-tension clamps keep themselves properly adjusted. They are, however, one of a mechanic’s knuckles’ worst enemies, and very difficult to detach without the right tools. Additionally, factory installations aren’t always the easiest to remove, which is where flexible hose clamp pliers come in.

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Bessey’s Maxis VarioPivot clamping system extends the versatility of your bar clamps by attaching them to your bench, somewhat like the previously covered VersaClamp.  It works best with Bessey’s K-Body Clamps, but they claim the system works with other bar or pipe clamps too.

The two C-clamp-like ends attach to your bench top and capture any length of bar clamp between them. The clamps fit into rotating holders which can lock the bar clamp at any angle between 0 to 270°.  The holders rest in an L-shaped track, which allows you to position the bar clamp along the side of the bench or over the work surface.

The Maxis VarioPivot Clamping system comes with the two c-clamp ends and runs about $50. You’ll need to provide your own bar clamp.

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Frankly, I was going to post about the Alpha JackClamp a while ago, but when I went to their website to gather information, it was hacked, so I forgot about the clamp. As of late, I keep running into ads and reviews for the product and figured it was time to give it a fair shake.

The first thing you notice about the Alpha JackClamp it that it has this extra bar where other bar clamps just have a jaw pad. This extra bar gives the JackClamp some interesting abilities. As a bar clamp, it has a 13″ deep throat for clamping around obstructions. Flipping the handle around the extra bar gives the JackClamp a 33″ spreading span.

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For holding miters together while gluing, reader fred recommended the Clam Clamp as an alternative to spring miter clamps.   The Clam Clamp holds the work pieces together so securely that you can pick them up and carry them around while the glue is still wet.

Chestnut Tool designed the Clam Clamp specifically to make the assembly of door and window casings faster and simpler.  With one half-turn of the handle the unique cam design secures the miter joint.  But how does it stay in place, you ask?  Little nickle-plated alloy pins perpendicular to the jaw bite into the wood to keep it in place.  It does leave a few easily filled dimples in the edge of the wood, but so would spring clamps or nails.

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This tool looks like some medieval nasal torture device, but it’s actually a handy spring clamp for holding small miters together.  You can operate it easily with one hand — Ulmia builds the handle right into the clamps, unlike other wire spring clamps that need separate pliers.

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