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Countless products are available for filling wood, but they all have their problems. They either dry out before you can use them, don’t expand and contract with the wood, aren’t stainable, are messy to use, or just plain don’t stand up to time. Could QuikWood’s two-part epoxy-in-a-stick be a better choice?

The base and activator are already measured out in the right ratio, so all you need to do is cut off a hunk of the stick and knead it in your hands for a minute until the putty-like epoxy is one consistent color. There’s no mess, no measuring, and no stirring.

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You can use bar clamps, parallel clamps, or a vertical clamping system like Hawk’s to glue up a flat panel from several small pieces, but you have to watch out for the panel warping or cupping. The Plano glue press ensures flat panels by exerting force on both the edges and the top and bottom of the panel.

Advanced Machinery claims that by using their system you don’t need other alignment methods like dowels or biscuits, and the panels come out flat so there’s no additional planing or sanding required to get a flat surface. The clamps mount vertically on a 39″ rail to save space, which also supposedly reduces drying time. You can make panels up to 5″ thick and can expand the system to make almost any length of panel, but they recommend one clamp at least every 12″.

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Who needs a tape measure? Just slap down a few rolls’ worth of Red Tape adhesive measuring tape on every surface in your shop and you won’t have to search for where you put the damn tape measure anymore.

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Soldering isn’t your only option for an electrically conductive connection. MG Chemicals sells one alternative — the two-part silver conductive epoxy pictured above.

When the silver epoxy cures you’re left with a bond that’s not only high strength, but also highly conductive to electricity. You can use it to connect heat sensitive components, connect broken traces, or even bond heat sinks. The epoxy bonds well to metals, but it also bonds to glass, wood, paper, fiber and rubber.

One drawback to using this epoxy is that you can’t solder to it and you need to be careful soldering around it because it might melt. Another is that you have to wait 4 to 5 hours for it to cure.

Prices for MG Chemical’s two-part silver epoxy start at $25 for two 3mL syringes.

Silver Conductive Epoxy [MG Chemicals]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Silver Conductive Epoxy [CableOrganizer.com]

If it’s good enough for a nuclear power plant it must be good enough for you.  3M designed its Performance Plus Duct Tape to meet the low leechable-halogen-and-sulfur requirements of nuclear power plants.  What does this mean to you?  Besides sounding cool, not much — but the tape has other advantages as well.

You can use the tape permanently or temporarily either indoor or out and for temperatures up to 200°F.  The tape removes cleanly from most opaque surfaces for up to six months, and it’s UV and sunlight resistant up to one year, which means the backing won’t deteriorate or delaminate.  The surface is also writable if you need to mark or label it.

3M uses polyethylene film over cloth scrim for the waterproof backing and a mixture of natural and synthetic rubber for the adhesive.  You can purchase the tape in slate blue or red.   A 60-yard roll of nuclear-grade duct tape will run you about $15.

Nuclear-Grade Duct Tape [3M]
Street Pricing [Google]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

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No matter how carefully you mask off an area, sometimes a little paint will still bleed under the tape and leave a less-than-crisp edge.  Shuretape Technologies claims that if you use their Frog Tape instead of other masking tapes you’ll get crisp, clean lines every time.

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