jump to example.com
Currently viewing the category: "WoodCraft"

Spacing markings equidistantly can be tedious and prone to error; it’s easy to make mistakes calculating the distance between the marks. The Point-2-Point from M-Power makes spacing marks equidistantly almost as easy as pulling out a tape measure.

Just choose how many points you need to mark and stretch the Point-2-Point so that the bracketing uprights line up with the ends of your project. The geometry of the gauge keeps each upright the same distance away from the next, no matter how far it’s stretched. For example, if you need to mark three equally-spaced holes on a board, line up the first upright with one end of the board and the 5th upright with the other end of the board.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

If you want to match the finish of a particular piece of furniture, the Finisher’s Colorwheel will help you get close, even if you know nothing about matching color.

To find the right mixture, turn the inside wheel and look for the closest color to appear in one of the windows. The color wheel will tell you how to mix the color using standard liquid dyes, powder dyes, or liquid stains in the following colors: white, raw umber, french yellow ochre, burnt sienna, cordovan, burnt umber, raw sienna, black, yellow, green, red, and orange.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Pipe clamps are a cheap and easy way to clamp glue-ups, but they only apply pressure on the first few inches near the edge. You can always alternate clamps on the top and bottom to apply more even pressure, but this only works for stock under 5″ thick or so. If you’re putting together an even thicker slab, you should probably make sure you apply pressure to the middle, too.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Countless products are available for filling wood, but they all have their problems. They either dry out before you can use them, don’t expand and contract with the wood, aren’t stainable, are messy to use, or just plain don’t stand up to time. Could QuikWood’s two-part epoxy-in-a-stick be a better choice?

The base and activator are already measured out in the right ratio, so all you need to do is cut off a hunk of the stick and knead it in your hands for a minute until the putty-like epoxy is one consistent color. There’s no mess, no measuring, and no stirring.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

You’ve mastered sharpening your plane blades and chisels; now it’s time to work on getting those curved tools razor sharp. One way to ensure an even edge is to use a jig like the Oar Sharpener.

Designed by Ross Oar and machined in the U.S. by West Falls Woodcarvings (Ross and Barbara Oar’s company), the aluminum sharpening jig clamps over the tool to keep its edge at the correct sharpening angle. Besides gouges and V-tools, the Oar Sharpener will also work with bench chisels up to 1-1/2″ wide.

The Oar Sharpener comes with complete instructions. Pricing starts around $29 before shipping.

Oar Sharpener [Stadtlander WoodCarving]
Oar Sharpener [Tools for Working Wood]
Oar Sharpener [WoodCraft]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

Do you ever get the inclination to look really silly in your shop? Wearing a pair of Shoe Bibs will satisfy that urge and then some. Just make sure that nobody sneaks a picture while you’re wearing them or you’ll be the laughing stock of the Internet.

Seriously though, you wear the shoe bibs around your ankles to prevent sawdust and other debris from falling into your shoes and socks. Personally, I don’t really notice any  sawdust or swarf getting into my socks or shoes — somehow it finds a way into my shirt or jeans pocket, but fortunately these won’t help. The bibs stay in place thanks to hook-and-loop fasteners, otherwise known as Velcro.

Available only in Desert Camo (Really? What are you trying to hide from in your shop?), fashionistas can pick up a pair at WoodCraft for $20 before shipping.

Shoe Bibs [WoodCraft]

Tagged with:
 

Growing up in Paul Bunyan country, I remember seeing antique two-man saws on display in many businesses around town. I used to picture lumberjacks a century ago, knee-deep in snow, hacking away at a 4-foot diameter tree trunk with one of these saws — no gas, no electricity, just pure muscle.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

The temperatures are dropping and you’ve started getting out the winter clothes, but did you ever think about your poor router feeling the chill? JessEm has your router covered with their Rout-R-Jacket… oh wait, it’s not that kind of jacket? Let’s try this again.

Unless you have a fully enclosed router table, collecting all the dust you produce can be hard. About a year ago we covered the Dust Bucket, a sheet metal box that encloses your router to catch the dust. JessEm’s Rout-R-Jacket is a similar type of enclosure, except it’s made out of fabric.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

There are tons of different shelf support systems on the market, but not every system works well in every situation. FastCap’s Speed Brace has features that may make it a better choice when it comes to certain tasks.

The first and most notable feature is an alignment notch that FastCap claims makes aligning many supports easy. Just install a straight cleat level on the wall and the Speed Brace’s 1-1/2″ by 1-1/2″ notch slips over the cleat, making aligning each brace almost foolproof. I wonder if using a cleat to align other types of shelf brackets wouldn’t work equally as well, but then what do I know?

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

There comes a time when you realize that using your regular chisels on large timbers is a fruitless endeavor. While a 1″ blade might cut a notch in 4×8 timber in a few hours, you might as well try to cut down a redwood with a dovetail saw — although you probably wouldn’t get very far before the park rangers detained you anyway.

Slicks, on the other hand, are made for the task of framing with large wood. One of the largest types of chisel, the slick’s wide blade with the long flat back makes quicker work of large notches. Not meant to be struck, the slick’s long handle gives you the leverage to shear curls of wood with just the motion of your body and arms.

Continue reading »

Tagged with: