jump to example.com
Currently viewing the category: "Lowe’s"

We can’t say for certain whether Sean’s input actually had anything to do with it, but consider this: Every time we at Toolmonger had any contact at all with the folks at Stanley, Sean made it a point to go on at length — and I mean shut-up-we-already-know-how-you-feel-about-this length — about how much he loooooooves their 12′ short tape. He got one free with a set of Stanley screwdrivers years back and was heartbroken that he couldn’t easily buy one separately.

Continue reading »

 

I made a stop at the local Lowe’s today to grab a wall box (and some drywall materials to fix the “other” hole I made before I found the right spot) and came across the above display in the tool corral. It made me wonder: If you were faced with this selection — from left to right: Skil’s 3310 for $140, Skil’s 3410 for $190, Porter Cable’s PCB220TS for $300, and DeWalt’s DW744X for $500 — which saw would you buy? And most importantly, why?

Continue reading »

 

As usual for this time of year, the big boxes are offering deals on basic- and classic-model ceiling fans. Currently Lowe’s is selling the Harbor Breeze 52″ classic fan (pictured above) for $45; Home Depot has apartment-style Littleton fans for around $20(!), and even Amazon’s got a couple of deals on Emerson and Westinghouse fans.

In my experience, ceiling fans need not be expensive or fancy to do the job. Keeping the air moving and the a/c bill down in the summer is my prime concern, and $40 is the right price for the savings in both energy and cash.

Hampton Bay 52″ Farmington Ceiling Fan [Home Depot]
Harbor Breeze 52″ Classic Brushed Nickel Ceiling Fan [Lowe’s]
Littleton White 42″ Ceiling Fan With Light Kit [Home Depot]
Emerson 52″ Ceiling Fan Via Amazon [What’s This?]

 

A few months ago I was up in the attic using a trouble light to find my way around. I dropped the light, broke the bulb filament, and was left in the dark to feel my way back to the hatch. Next time I went up I brought a flashlight with me so when I dropped the trouble light for the second time I could actually see. After that experience, I asked for an LED trouble light for Christmas.

Of course, if I wasn’t such an idiot I would have been using a rough service bulb instead of a normal household bulb in the trouble light. A rough service light bulb has a shock-resistant filament so it doesn’t break when you drop it, and usually some sort of coating to contain the glass if it breaks.  Several manufacturers including Sylvania, GE, Feit, Philips, and Westinghouse make rough service bulbs that fit a medium screw base — think normal light socket — in a variety of wattages.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This Whisper Drive door opener caught our attention on a Lowe’s outing a couple of weeks ago, and now it’s on sale. Marked down from $248, it’s just $188 today only. The tale of the tape: You get a 3/4 horsepower motor, a motion-detecting control panel, two 3-button remotes, a mini-remote, a wireless exterior keypad, and safety sensors. And since it’s a belt-type opener, it’s vewy, vewy, qwiet.

My favorite part is the exterior keypad, though. I never thought twice about these until Sean installed one and I realized how incredibly convenient they are. Forget your remote — or (better yet) leave it in the car that’s in the garage? Just hop out, key in your code, and you’re good to go. It’s also handy when you want to, say, loan a tool to a friend. Just give ’em the code and they can come get it without rolling you out of bed at 6:00 a.m. on Saturday.

Chamberlain 3/4 HP Whisper Drive Plus Garage Access System [Lowe’s]

 

If this Task Force drill looks the tiniest bit familiar, it should. It looks almost exactly like the Black & Decker Ni-Cad 18v from a year or two ago. It’s now down from $50 to $30 at Lowe’s. We’re not sure that’s going to be enough to get them to fly off shelves, but it’s a step in the right direction.

Those really seeking a super deal might just hit the old Harbor Freight $20 drill bin, but less than $40 is still a reasonable price for a cheap drill. This one will be on sale “While Supplies Last” which translates to “when last year’s stock is gone.”

What do you think? Is ten bucks worth it, or will any junk drill do when it comes to the world of cheap-ass Ni-Cad? Let us know in comments.

Task Force Drill [Lowe’s]

 

I make no secret that I am a sucker for real wood on tools. Better yet, I love the ones I feel like I can actually use instead of the kind that’d make you feel bad if it were banged up a little. These Sheffield gift sets from Lowe’s are headed in the right direction.

Continue reading »

 

I’ve been postponing hanging some family pictures for a while — OK, it’s been years; happy now? — but recent “suggestions” from my patient but persistent wife prompted me to actually do something. Naturally, the first thing I did — in order to procrastinate further — was to check the web to see if I had all the necessary stuff. One site (TM 11/11/07) — our favorite — had a reference to a nice tutorial. I also ran across the Hangman Products site and noticed they have several items relevant to my pending project, plus a neat motto (Hang It Level Every Time®).

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Wobble Wedges® are small (1″ × 1 ¼” × ¼”) tapered (4°) wedges made from hard clear (there’s also a black version for photographers) polypropylene or soft white vinyl, which is easily trimmed. They have interlocking ridge teeth to prevent slipping when stacked. The manufacturer lists a myriad of uses for these shims, including plumbers, installers, cabinet makers, homeowners, and even restaurants — for leveling those tippy tables.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Lex’s recent post on captive nuts reminded me of some other nuts I’ve been using a lot lately while doing some volunteer work on a search-and-rescue van: nylon-insert hex nuts. Depending on which big box you shop at, and whom you ask when there, they’re also called stop nuts, locknuts, or nyloks (although NYLOK® is a nylon material typically applied to bolts and screws), or nylocks. I like them because they resist vibration and loosening, they’re reusable, they don’t damage threads, and they’re readily available. McMaster-Carr has a large variety in their catalog, and many of the big boxes carry Hillman versions.

Continue reading »

Tagged with: