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TM has covered stubby* drivers before (e.g., 2/10/07, 7/10/09, and 7/14/09), and their usefulness when just nothing else will fit. Now Wiha has five new stubby 6-In-1 bit sets. The bits are stored in the “Ergo Soft Grip” handle and the overall length, with a bit inserted in the ¼” SS holder, is just 2.5″. Bit sets include Torx model 38045 (T8, T10, T15, T20, T25, and T30), security Torx model 38047 (same sizes), ball hex model 38056 (1/8″, 9/64″, 5/32″, 3/16″, 7/32″, and 1/4″), slotted/Phillips/square model 38048 (4.5, 6.5, P#1, P#2, square #1, and square #2), and, pictured above, slotted/Phillips/pozi model 38043 (4.5, 6.5, P#1, P#2, pozi #1, and pozi #2).

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Wiha recently introduced their line of insulated Inomic Pliers and Cutters. The supposed ergonomic design resembles the pistol grip of the Grip-On ErgoGrip locking pliers we previously covered. The “optimal” 23° offset design supposedly reduces hand fatigue and injury risk because the pistol-style grip is a more “natural” alignment for your wrist.

The 23° offset confused me for a minute until I realized that for some reason they measured angle of the heads from a line perpendicular to the handle, rather than from where the heads should be — parallel to the handle.

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There are lots of ways to store multiple insert bits in a multi-bit screwdriver, but Wiha might have the neatest.  As the eight-bit tray flips out of the ergonomic cushion-grip handle, the internal drawer rotates so you can easily access the bits.

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I use these Drive-Loc sets at work for small equipment repair, and I’ve grown to like ’em.  As with other similar drivers, you insert the bit into the handle, but Wiha’s Drive-Loc mechanism allows you to adjust the bit length as well — you get full-length, stubby, and the in-between sizes in one bit.

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UniversalPart.com is selling the wonderfully tiny Wiha pocket-sized precision screwdriver set for only $14.46. The set includes a handle and four double-ended interchangeable bits with both Phillips and slotted tips — for the multitude of tiny-screw problems that life throws your way.

Pocket-Sized Precision Screwdriver Set [UniversalPart.com]
Street Pricing [Google Products]

 
Slotted Phillips

For the sake of convenience engineers designed the terminal-block screw, which can be driven with either a slotted or Phillips screwdriver. Although a slotted screwdriver can transfer a lot of torque to a fastener, it can slip off the head — not very desirable if you’re working inside a service panel. On the other hand, a Phillips screwdriver stays on the screw head, but tends to cam out at higher torque. To specifically fit terminal-block screws, Wiha designed these cross-slotted screwdrivers, incorporating the best features of both slotted and Phillips drivers.

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Wiha makes excellent precision screwdrivers, but their full-sized drivers deserve the same praise. The ribbed tips on Wiha’s Anti-Cam-Out screwdrivers prevent the tool from slipping off of fasteners, which prevents damaged fasteners and personal injury. Their comfortable and contoured no-roll handles, durable tips, and low cost make Wiha’s A.C.O. and 3K screwdrivers great tools.

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Call me a weenie if you will, but I actually like to use insulated screwdrivers even for things like installing a light switch.  Sure, it should be off, but why take the chance?

The one pictured above is from Wiha, who makes some seriously sweet screwdrivers, but you can also find them at pretty much any hardware store for cheap.  Even if you’re not an electrician, there’s really no reason not to have at least one medium Phillips and one medium standard around the house.

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Evan writes: “Sears lists this simply as ‘magnetizer, magnet, and demagnetizer.’  I love it for things like hex keys which are not normally magnetic.  With this you don’t have to have a magnet attached to the tool.”

For those not familiar, the idea behind this is that you can pass your tool through the magnets to magnetize a ferrous tool when needed, then demagnetize it for use with electronics and other such delicate work. 

Personally, I like Wiha’s model better.  (Picture after the jump.)

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