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The parallel hooks on the end of OTC’s serpentine belt installation tool allow you to grip serpentine belts, V-belts, or timing belts and maneuver them around pulleys, especially in hard to reach areas.  The 25″ long tool weighs 10 oz. and runs about $20.

Installation Tool [OTC Tools]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

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The bigger the tire, the harder it is to remove and replace a wheel on the vehicle. At some point the wheel gets larger than you can safely handle — that’s when you pull out the Wheel Mate from OTC Tools.

OTC constructs the Wheel Mate from structural steel tubing, and its U-shaped base gives it clearance to fit around the wheel and under the vehicle. It moves freely on heavy-duty ball bearing casters and locks with a foot-operated lever so it won’t go rolling about.

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From time to time when you’re taking something apart, you run into an e-clip. Sure, you can pry them off with a screwdriver, but getting them back on can present a problem if you don’t have the right tool.  This set of tools from OTC allows you to both remove and install four different sizes of e-clip.

The set comes with tools for 6mm, 7mm, 8mm, and 9mm e-clips. One end of the tool removes the e-clip while the other installs them. Each tool locks into the provided handle to give you a better grip.

To buy this tool set you can pay anywhere from $10 to $20 before shipping and handling.

E-Clip Tool [OTC]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

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Not everybody needs an ultra-low profile jack, but if you’re regularly working on high-performance cars you probably run into the problem of getting the jack under the car from time to time. With a saddle height of only 1-7/8, it’ll be hard to find a vehicle too low for this new jack from OTC tools.

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Sears is selling OTC’s GM Pitman Arm Tool, or Pickle Fork, for just $16.  It’ll help you remove the Pitman arm on your GM pickup or SUV, should you be so inclined.

OTC GM Pitman Arm Tool [Sears]
Street Pricing [Google]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

 

If you only use a pry bar occasionally or don’t have the room for a full-out pry bar, this pry bar head attachment from OTC Tools fits onto a 3/8″-drive breaker bar or ratchet and turns it into a rolling-head pry bar.  Even though OTC specifically says ratchet, we wouldn’t risk a good one.

Measuring 2″ long by 2-13/16″ wide by 5/8″ thick and weighing about 3oz., this little tool is surprisingly expensive.  Most places charge $50 or more — but not good old Harbor Freight.  For $7 they sell a tool that matches OTC’s description and picture almost identically.  We’d be willing to bet it’s the same tool.

Pry Bar Head [OTC Tools]
Street Pricing [Google]
Pry Bar Head [Harbor Freight]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

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springcompressor1.jpg

Once (in my youth) a friend and I were assembling a strut with a coil-over spring with one of those crappy five-dollar compressor tools.  I looked away for a second and there was a bang followed by silence.  The spring had come loose and knocked my friend’s hat off while blowing by his face.  Since then I lean towards stronger and more stable spring compressors — like the Strut Tamer from OTC.  It’s large, heavy-duty, and not going to lose its grip at an inopportune moment.

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While pondering upcoming Toolmonger automotive projects today, our thoughts turned to tools we wish we could afford but can’t — specifically a power train lift.  If you’ve never used one of these, let me introduce you: Power train lift, these are Toolmongers.  Toolmongers, this is a device that significantly simplifies an engine swap — especially if the engine you’re swapping in doesn’t fit.  (And what better reason is there to do a swap in the first place?) 

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Sure, your gagillion-volt cordless uber-hammer-driver can make a lot of torque, but this “old school” method of freeing stuck fasteners really works

When you strike the top of the driver with a hammer, you not only drive the bit into the fastener, but also turn it as the wrench converts some of that downward force into rotational force — giving you the best possible chance of freeing the fastener without camming it out.

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