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Remember back when we told you about the Stanley Black & Decker merger, speculating that you’d see some of the underlying brands breaking out of their previous molds? It’s happening. Above you see a pretty straightforward folding retractable utility knife. But it’s part of DeWalt’s new hand tool line, which we understand will include all sorts of tools you probably never expected to see under the DeWalt brand. We’ll have more on those additions in coming weeks and months, but let’s start off with a look at this little utility knife.

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Most manufacturers sell adapters so you can use a router or a jigsaw with their saw track, but DeWalt also sells two accessories for their track saws that can both help align the track and be used as a layout tool.

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With a new truck parked outside the shop, I took the opportunity to reorganize my vehicle’s toolkit. As I shuffled things about, I found I needed different types of storage for the truck, so I began repacking with newfound efficiency. What you are looking at here (above) is the most useful thing the Craftsman Li-Ion bag has done since we destroyed all the tools that went in it a while back.

Another repurposed item was this sweet DeWalt magnetic storage box, which I found will hold an entire 40-piece socket set and still clip shut with no issue.

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The track saw has matured from its humble beginnings as circular saw with a straightedge to being called a table saw replacement by some companies. That doesn’t ring true to me, because a table saw is much more than a tool for working with sheet goods. It seems to me that track saws are more of a replacement for the bulky panel saw lurking in the shadows of the shop.

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BuildingOnline.com reported this week that DeWalt and Empire announced “that they will end their partnership on the private label line of professional box levels that Empire Level licensed, designed and manufactured in 2010 under the DeWalt brand.” Considering DeWalt’s new Stanley Black & Decker heritage, this shouldn’t come as a surprise.

What may be surprising, however, is what else comes from this still-shaking-out merger. Back when it first happened, we received a lot of reader mail. You were concerned about discontinuation of popular product lines, and you hoped for new, greater ones. We posted some of our best guesses — including new combos of power and hand tools crossing traditionally-separated brands and price categories — and we’re still convinced we’re on the right track. Of course, we’ll know even more when we see available products.

DeWalt/Empire Agree To End Private Label Partnership [BuildingOnline]

 

I purchased my DeWalt 12″ miter saw about 10 years ago, and I wouldn’t make the same choice today — I almost certainly would buy a sliding miter saw instead. Back then the choice of sliding miter saws was limited, and they were very expensive. As the title suggests, the other thing I’d do differently is choose a 10″ over a 12″ saw.

It’s not that my DeWalt 12″ it isn’t a good saw; it’s just that I chose it based on a landscaping project I was planning that required cutting a bunch of 4x6s. Rather than trying to figure out my future needs, I weighed too heavily the fact that a 12″ saw could cut a 4×6 with a single cut. I haven’t cut another 4×6 since.

I’ve learned a few things since then and have a few reasons for buying a 10″ saw. Maybe the type of projects you do require a bigger saw (building decks comes to mind), but for the average woodworker/DIYer, the following reasons might be something to consider.

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Looking for a killer “big present” for your favorite DIYer? Sure, lithium ion is the hot ticket, but step back to Ni-Cd and you find deals like this: a four-piece DeWalt cordless kit — hammer-drill, impact driver, recip saw, and flashlight — for under $400, complete with a battery and charger.

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Take a moment and think about what a rotary hammer does. Yeah, it makes holes in materials like concrete by spinning fast — that’s the rotary part. It also slams the tip of the drill bit into the surface up to 4,300 times per minute. But not all of that energy finds its way to the surface; some of it gets transferred back to the operator — oh, my aching joints!

The point behind Dewalt’s new SHOCKS system is to reduce the amount of vibration transferred to the operator. To accomplish this, they mount the rear handle of the tool on shocks. They claim this reduces strain and fatigue, and increases control of the tool.

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Since we’ve seen Bosch ramp up dust collection on their rotary hammers, you’d expect other manufacturers to be following suit. Recently, Dewalt introduced their D25301D-XJ Dust Extraction Telescope for their corded and cordless SDS rotary hammers.

Adding only 1.4 lbs. to your rotary hammer, the Dust Extractor can be used to drill dust-free holes up to 16 mm (5/8″) in diameter and 150 mm (~6″) deep. It’s easy to assemble and remove without tools and comes with with a 150 cm (5′) long, 35 mm (1-3/8″) diameter rubber hose and a side handle.

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We know: You’ve seen dozens of not-inexpensive dust collection vacs, and if you can’t afford one, you’ve probably managed to throw your own together with an auto switch and shop vacuum. So why tell you about this new one from DeWalt? Answer: It cleans its own filters.

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