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ArmyNavyUSA.com is offering a deal on Wolverine’s 6″ DuraShocks Slip Resistant Work Boots for $99.95, and all of their boots over $89.99 qualify for free shipping through January 30.

Toolmonger previously covered Wolverine work boots in 2007 and in 2008 with Sean’s detailed Hands-On review of the 8″ Raiders. This winter, since half the U.S. is covered in ice, these #W02038 slip resistant, waterproof boots might be handy to have on hand (or foot).

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While this awkwardly-named tool belt looks like a total home run for the safety/rescue crowd, I’d be willing to bet Toolmongers could find use for it as well. With tapered, deep pockets and PVC reinforcement at key stress points, it looks like it could hold pretty much anything you want to strap on.

The information directly from Bucket Boss is thin, but other sites reveal a few more details. It’ll expand to accommodate up to a 52″ waist, and it’s made of “ballistic material” which I assume is nylon. Some sites tag specific pockets as designed for a speed square, nail set, and knife pocket, while others don’t specify. All seem to agree that there’s a cell phone holder and a cordless tool (read: drill/driver) holder included.

Regardless, you’ll find it for around $60 all over.

Extreme Gear 55035 Mullet Buster Tool Belt [Google]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

 

A friend of mine in high school had a crappy old Delta 88 complete with that horrid GM 350 diesel. As a result he was endlessly rebuilding it, even in the wintertime. His secret to keeping warm while pulling the engine in 35-degree weather? Insulated coveralls. The ones you see here are a cotton set from work-clothes masters Dickies, but you can find a set at most tractor supply shops — or pretty much any place working people shop.

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So admittedly Toolmonger’s own Sean O’Hara isn’t exactly recognized as a world-class sartorialist, despite the fact that he owns more than one suit and that most TM staffers agree that he “cleans up pretty well.” But savor this rare moment: GQ — yes, that GQ — agrees with something he’s been banging our ears off about for years. On page 64 of the November issue — the first page of their GQ winter survival guide — they recommend “Start from the bottom: lace up in a classic American work boot.”

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Mechanix gloves are a popular topic here at Toolmonger. We like their excellent protection, improved grip, and Robocop aesthetic, but there’s an offering coming that’s more up Spiderman’s alley. The spiny knuckle ribbing and web-like hex grid over the heavy fabric of their soon-to-be-released MRT 0.5 M-Pact gloves wouldn’t be out of place on a Marvel villain’s hands, but there are some new tricks beyond looks built into these gloves.

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Even with my limited personal experience with welding, I’ve always been a fan of Miller helmets. One, they seem to be pretty rugged, and two, helmets like the Titanium Elite series Silver (Model 234939) don’t look like the stuff that was handed out in shop class back in the day.

This brain bucket features an aluminum heat shield that protects the analog lens in high amperage 300 plus amp operations and a silver-colored shell reflects heat to keep the helmet (and the noggin inside) cool(ish). The 234939 also has a quick-release snap-off frame for easy-access lens changes.

It’s a good looking, well-designed helmet that will keep your head out of harm’s way, and if you’ve got around $270 you can have one of your very own. Just don’t expect it to stay Lancelot-shiny for very long; it is meant to be used in a welding shop, after all.

Titanium Elite series Silver, Model 234939  [Miller]
Street Pricing [Google Products]

 


The 21st century must be here; you can now get carbon fiber in your shoes. Not that anyone will notice, but perhaps later on they’ll start putting them on the outside like carbon fiber car hoods or something.

While not all of these new boots use carbon fiber, composite-toe safety shoes are becoming commonplace, using fiberglass or similar materials. Lighter than and just as strong as steel toes, they help to keep your dogs from barkin’ too loudly at the end of the day, without sacrificing any peace of mind. Most of the larger manufacturers such as Wolverine, Bates, and Hytest, have one or more offerings with composite toes, and they generally retail for a few dollars more than their steel-capped counterparts.

Whether a lighter shoe is worth the extra cash depends on how much value you place on comfort, but given how high the cost of good safety shoes can be, an extra $10 or $20 seems like a good trade.

Wolverine CarbonMAX boots [Wolverine]
Bates Composite-toe Boots [Bates]
Hytest Composite-toe Boots [Hytest]

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While I have not worn my Duluth Trading Souped-up Sweatpants lately (for those of you not in central Texas, it’s been damn hot here this summer), I do like them when working outside or in the garage in cool weather. They don’t seem unreasonably priced at $40 when you consider they’re made of 10-oz. fleece, have double-layer knees, a gusset crotch, zip-fly front, webbing belt and buckle, zippered back pockets, extra side pockets, AND utility loops. They’re not kidding when they say “souped-up.” These sweatpants are also pretty comfy for kicking back and watching football on Sunday afternoons.

Duluth Trading Co. [Manufacturer’s Site]

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Toolmongers with feet that would impress a yeti know the pain of trying to find a good pair of work boots. Wide-footed individuals the world over have leaned towards New Balance products for ages, but New Balance doesn’t make work boots, do they?  Well, sort of:  Rockport Works, a work shoe manufacturer, contracts with New Balance to design their foot beds and toe caps, leaving the uppers, tongue, and lace arrangement for themselves, at least according to Moe at Harry’s Army Surplus.

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While sports-themed, bike-themed, and just plain girly hardhats have been spotted before, they all take second fiddle to Smith and Wesson’s hardhat. It comes with a four-point nylon ratchet suspension, a wide brim for protection against harmful UV rays, and is in compliance with ANSI Z89.1-2003 (Class G electrical-low voltage).

Fashioned after the classic ten-gallon Stetson, this one will hold remarkably less, but after a day or two on site, you probably shouldn’t drink out of it anyway.

The Smith and Wesson hardhat will fit head sizes from 6½ to 8, and will set you back $29, partner.

Street pricing [Google]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]