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A couple of sawhorses and a sheet of plywood make a handy table, but if you put too much weight on the middle, it’ll start to sag. Rockler has come up with some brackets that slip over the saw horses and hold another 2×4 or two for supporting the middle of the table.

Rockler also includes screws for securing the brackets to the sawhorses, which’ll probably get lost anyway. I don’t see why some general purpose constructions screws wouldn’t work just as well.

A four-pack of steel brackets runs around $13.

Saw Horse Supports [Rockler]

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I found myself in the shop yesterday building a quick bracket to mount some equipment in the house. Because I have a ton of scrap metal lying around (and a nice MIG welder), I built it out of metal. I tacked together a couple of pieces of 1/8″ x 5″ flat bar to make a flat panel, and I was about to weld on a couple of pieces of 16-gauge square tube when I noticed a box sitting on the shelf above my shop sink: drill screws.

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There are tons of ways to hold shelves, but I’ve never seen a way that easily lets you change the height of the shelf without removing the contents first, like Monterey Shelf claims their Speedy Shelf Strips can do. However, looking at the design it seems like it might be a little easier to raise the shelf than lower it.

The individual Speedy Shelf Strips are either 18″ or 24″ long and have interlocking ends to make longer strips. There are no extra pins or brackets to lose — the spring-loaded supports are integrated into the strips. The co-polymer polypropylene strips can be cut with a knife or saw and can be installed either with screws or nails. Monterey Shelf claims the strips held over 150 lbs. per shelf in the lab.

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One of my goals when replacing my kitchen floor was to get rid of the ugly dishwasher bottom plate and replace it with what looked like a seamless toe-kick along that bank of cabinets. I had a hard time figuring out how to connect the removable portion so I could access under the dishwasher, and finally settled for a friction fit. Unfortunately, the toe-kick moves around and shows a large gap. Maybe these Plinth Locks from Unika would solve my issues if I ever got around to fixing them.

Plinth Lock isn’t a new product, just new to us, as it has been available across the pond for some time. Using Plinth instead of toe-kick in the name of the product seems to be a giveaway that it isn’t made here. Previously I’d only heard Plinth used to reference the block that door molding rests upon in fancier installations.

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The all-metal Combi-Bolt features a 3/8″ diameter solid steel bolt that slides into a strike or bolt receiver, leaving little of the shackle exposed. Because the shackle is protected, they claim it’s more secure than hasp and padlock designs. Plus with four pick-resistant dials, you get 10,000 possible codes — it goes without saying (but I’ll say it anyway) that it would take a long time guess the right code.

Made with chrome-plated brass dials and coated die-cast body, the Combi-Bolt was designed to withstand the elements. You can install the lock with only a drill (with the right sized bit) and screwdriver. Also included are one-way security screws, a bolt receiver to flush mount the Combi-Bolt, and a strike plate if you wish to recess the lock.

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My front door has been sticking for, well, months. And I’m not talking about the door itself, but rather the interior mechanism of the door latch. It’s essentially been a grip-strength test for anyone wishing to enter or exit my house from the front ever since it got sticky. The really sad part, though, is that it took a whopping half-hour to fix, twenty minutes of which I spent running to the local big-box to grab a couple of bucks in parts.

Bottom line: Don’t make the same mistake I did. Take a sec to fix it. Here’s how.

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Using shelf pins is one of the most common ways to make adjustable shelves, but they do have at least one downside — if the shelf isn’t exactly flat or the case is racked, the shelves might not contact all four supports, leaving you with a shelf that rocks — and not in a hip way.

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I received an email from a complete stranger asking if I could help source some replacement knockdown hardware for a “Scandinavian bed.” She has 4 of the 8 sets she needs to put it back together but couldn’t find replacements anywhere. The store she bought it from over a decade ago moved and threw out all their paperwork and older hardware (boo on them!).

This is the picture she sent me. She said in her email: “The longest piece is 1 3/4 inches long, the threaded portion of which is 1/4” diameter. The wide, ribbed piece is stamped “BREV N B38420″ on the top. That piece has a threaded hole, 3/8″ in diameter, drilled through its bottom. The short, stubby threaded piece, also 3/8″ diameter, fits that hole.”

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Anybody with kids or grandkids has gone through the childproofing stage. You find yourself crawling around on all fours, permanently damaging your nice cabinets (and maybe your knees) by installing safety latches to keep the wee ones out of unfriendly places like cleaning cupboards. Then after a few weeks you find yourself walking halfway across the house to throw something away in your bedroom rather than fuss with opening the latch to the kitchen garbage.

Kidco’s magnetic child locks could solve some of the potential pitfalls of installing child safety latches.  First they attach with adhesives, possibly saving your cabinets from damage. Second they open simply with the touch of a magnetic key in the proper location. They claim the key will release the latch through over one inch of solid wood.

The best pricing we could find was $20 shipped for a pack of three locks with one key and key holder. Now if it only had a targeting laser…

Magnetic Child Locks [Kidco]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

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I could have been a little more specific and called these quick-release pins, but how often do you get to start every word in a title with the same letter? Pegasus Racing pushbutton quick-release pins are handy little devices for critical, frequently-serviced assemblies. What makes them remarkable when compared with stainless marine versions or mild-steel hardware store parts is their strength. How does an 8,200-pound breaking strength when mounted in double shear sound? And that’s for the smallest of the lot, with only a 1/4″ diameter. Larger sizes (5/16″ and 3/8″) are also available and ratings increase accordingly, topping out at 18,400 pounds for the heaviest 3/8″ version.

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