jump to example.com

We imagine the product folks at Milwaukee have a tough sell with some of the newest rollouts this year. The deep cut band saw, for instance, looks just like the old one at first glance, and “2x tougher than the competition” claims based on the copper motor and slightly reformed outer shell armor can’t be the easiest thing to explain when someone is holding both versions side by side.

The deep cut band saw, so named for its 5″ x 5″ capacity, is 14.5 lbs. of 11-amp cutting power encased by the aforementioned armor. The new motor technology, which we’re guessing is going to be making appearances in all the corded line to come, gets its added boost by fitting more copper into a smaller space. This in turn makes the motor housing smaller and allows for the new slimmer profile.

We can understand why Milwaukee is proud: a lot went into the new motor, and it is smaller and just as powerful. The unit as a whole will survive a ton of abuse and still keep kicking. They also went all low-key and didn’t stick a ton of badging on it or change the color to emphasize their point. They just made the changes, did some quiet high-fives around the testing lab, and went back to work — which we have to admit is a classy move.

6232-20_2 Bandsaw [Milwaukee Press Release]

 

10 Responses to Preview: Milwaukee Deep Cut Bandsaw

  1. Will says:

    So what does one actually use a handheld bandsaw for? I’m not asking to be snarky, I genuinely don’t know, as my only exposure to bandsaws is fixed models for cutting wood or metal in a precise, non-portable kind of way.

    • HuyTV says:

      Sometimes you have to bring it to another place to work or using it to cut some material that you can’t put it on the bandsaw

  2. Corey Mac says:

    Will,
    As a electrician, this tool (I own the last generation) is a god send when it comes to cutting emt and uni-strut. It’s way quieter then a abrasive chop saw and doesn’t shoot sparks/ wheel material in all directions- to boot it leaves an edge that is easily dress-able. beyond that, I often use it for home metal working, it’s built 3 trailers for me as well as a tripod stand to turn it’s self into a stationary chop saw unit.

  3. mnoswad1 says:

    If only Paul Newman had one of these in the cordless version.

  4. Mike says:

    I’ve seen them used a lot in theater when tearing down a set made with steel. They work a lot better than a recip saw to break down structures built with tubular steel.

  5. browndog77 says:

    Anyone who has a bandsaw in the shop would appreciate the possibilities with these tools. Smoothness of cut & lack of noise are big factors, as is being able to get 5 24″ sections out of a 10′ piece of stock! (usually)

  6. Ian Random says:

    I seem to remember the portable version is favored by Adam Savage of Mythbusters fame.

  7. Crazy Ivan says:

    These things are indispensably awesome, and I can only dream of having one of the cordless models! These are so much more stable when cutting things that a recip saw or a saws-all would destroy; pipe is just the beginning. In some construction applications, angle iron, channel steel/superstructure, threaded rods, unistrut, and many other erectable materials have to be cut on site in some tight spaces, or cut with a precision and smoothness with one hand that is impossible to do with any other power tool. It’s a must-have to get that essential cut done right the first time. These are industry standard in Telecommunications construction for a reason, and I would kill to have one for around-home use. Their only real limit is the narrowness of the channel mouth, but that’s the tradeoff for stability and a straight cut. These things can chew their way through case-hardened steel like it’s butter. I wouldn’t be caught dead on a large construction job without one.

  8. Mike47 says:

    If you have ever cut water pipe, sewer pipe, angle iron or steel rod with a hacksaw or even a Sawzall, try a portable bandsaw just once… that’s all it takes to feel like, “I GOTTA have one of these!” You can find them in used but good condition on Ebay and in flea markets for much less than new retail. Word to the wise: Buy extra blades of the best bimetal quality, since no tool can make a bad blade work well. Crazy Ivan used the well-worn “awesome” word, but this time it is spot-on.

  9. James B. Kaplan says:

    I think you really need a portable saws. and just grinding them very sharp. or you can buy a new saw blade. because you can not complete your work with the blunt blade

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *