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It’s got to be a difficult deal when sitting down to do the year’s rollout plan on some of these tools like the rotary hammer. Milwaukee and other toolmakers are constantly trying to keep customers who want more choices and their preference of simple production runs, even when fewer SKUs might be better for a balanced budget. Either way, customers still need to drill big-ass holes in tough materials.

The newest 5/8″ SDS Rotary hammer is 10.9″ long and 4.6 lbs. heavy — smaller and lighter than it’s ever been. It packs 1.5 ft-lbs. of impact energy, turns at 0-3,700 RPM, and features the latest in anti-vibration tech. All this power on hand, and the first question out of everyone’s mouth is always “When are you going to do a cordless version with the same power?” If they do produce a cordless version of some tools, will there still be wailing and gnashing of teeth when the corded version is shelved for a while or not upgraded as often?

In short, we want everything and want to give up nothing — then demand they keep building products that lose money for them because we still find a use for it. I feel for the product planners; they lose no matter what they do. Thankfully the corded rotary hammer is going to be around awhile, mostly because big ugly holes in concrete are what they are: difficult to drill at the best of times, and a pain in the rear to handle without the right tools.

The newest rotary hammer will be available in July. Look for the pricing to be in line with the current offering.

5/8″ SDS Plus Rotary Hammer Kit 5263-21 [Milwaukee]

 

9 Responses to Preview: Milwaukee SDS Rotary Hammer Kit

  1. Ben says:

    some things i believe should be left corded, i know there is one guy out there that would actually need it cordless but there always is. i like cords

  2. GLR says:

    I agree with Ben. The only thing I find useful cordless is a non-hammer drill and impact driver. The latter only for driving screws, really. Never have understood cordless saws, either. Once used a cordless sawzall in a remote location, and it ate through batteries every few minutes it seemed (granted, this was almost 15 years ago). But each their own.

  3. PutnamEco says:

    Re: GLR says:
    The only thing I find useful cordless is a non-hammer drill and impact driver..
    ——
    18 volt for drills and impacts, 36 volt for everything else. Makes a WORLD of difference in reciprocating and circular saws. 18v = <10 minute vs 36v= 25 minute runtime.
    Sometimes cordless make a lot of sense, ever had pack in a generator on your back? They are not a replacement for corded when power is available, but they sure beat hand tools when it isn't.
    ———
    Re: Milwaukee and other toolmakers are constantly trying to keep customers who want more choices

    Maybe if the manufacturers steered away from value engineering and planned obsolescence they might find their lives a little easier. how often do companies like Snap-on and Festool churn through their product lines?

  4. OhioHead says:

    RE: Maybe if the manufacturers steered away from value engineering and planned obsolescence they might find their lives a little easier. how often do companies like Snap-on and Festool churn through their product lines?

    Come on look at who is running TTI (parent company of Milwaukee) Joe Gali (ex B & D executive), Milwaukee is getting better about “marketing” their stuff unlike in the 80’s,90’s and 00’s (when they sucked), but you have a B & D guy who loves tools and wants to kick B & D a##, but his heritage is turning product and has turn a lot product, the only way to do it is to improve/tweak 1 thing and call it all new, or take some of the ruggedness out of the products.

  5. JohnSims says:

    TTI or parent company of Milwaukee, and also makes Ryobi, and Ridgid cordless tools.

    They are going to copy the B&D style of marketing their tools like crazy all while cheapening the line to lower the cost.

  6. Sean O'Hara says:

    @JohnSims while I can agree that their recent marketing… Tattoo’s and Ass-ads on mixed martial artists is something along the lines of questionable I’ve seen their offerings in the last few years and they are producing some nice stuff. At the very least, market competitive. In some cases like their new electronic measuring tools area, damn outstanding.

  7. fred says:

    Re: PutnamEco Says:

    I’m not sure that the planned obsolecence thing is not a shared responsibility – the toolmaker’s seeming constant quest for adding “new” products with “added features” and us suckers for buying into this. I recall reading that at one time the philosophy in the auto manufcaturing world was that “the more models you had the more you sold” – so GM had Chevy, Pontiac, Oldsmobile , Buick and Cadillac on that basis – and launched Saturn to boot – plus tried to market some of their European brands in the US too. I’m not sure it it sold more cars – or even gave consumers any real choice. I think that I’d be happier with a few less tool choices with clear price and performance distinctions. There is the other issue about tools that are no longer serviceable at a reasonable cost – with the unfortunate manufcaturer’s expectation that you will want to buy a new tool rather than repair an old one. Finally, I still live in hope that maybe some standardization might take place on battery platforms (I know, I know – the restraint of trade folks will say no way to this.)

  8. dex says:

    Great all-around post Fred!

    I suppose this Milwaukee is made in China? A pity….

  9. Scott says:

    That particular Milwaukee model is actually made in Europe. Czech Republic I believe.

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