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After some of the worst nose-dives in terms of sales percentages in the Detroit automaker’s history, Ford is pulling in slightly better profits than expected. We won’t pretend to know the full extent of the borrowing and repayment structure they worked out and the impact it will have on the long-term economy of the Michigan area — we’re just in it for the trucks.

Toolmongers turn to trucks to get supplies and tools where they’re needed most. Ford has always been a solid companion alongside the working tradesmen and DIYers need to haul crap about with the Ranger, Courier, and the mighty “F” series. Go to any job site and there will likely be an “F” series of some kind there pulling duty.

Most of the heavy lifting in the rework of the Blue oval brand is still focused on the small and mid-sized market where Ford had miles of ground to cover in a few short years. What’s interesting is Ford maintains the F-150 still holds its own.

Ford Chief Financial Officer Lewis Booth said sales remain strong and profit margins high for F-series pickup trucks, led by the F-150, which remains the best-selling vehicle in the United States.

From what we’ve heard of the F-100 rumors having smaller size, less weight and bigger mpg numbers we wonder if it’s possible Ford has learned something over the last few years and is starting to tune into what consumers are looking for. Hint: it’s not giant road monsters that have a siphon attachment for your wallet.

At the very least, we see fewer commercials with jack-holes manning the wheelhouse of an F-350 for no logical reason. That’s got to count for something.

Ford posts quarterly profit, pays down debt [Yahoo News]

 

11 Responses to Ford And The F-150 Are Making The Numbers

  1. Dennis says:

    I’m pretty sure that Ford was the only American manufacturer that didn’t take the bailout money, so there is nothing for them to repay.

  2. Jupe Blue says:

    It was my understanding that Ford didn’t need a bailout because they had already secured financing prior to the economic collapse.

  3. techieman33 says:

    Ford didn’t take government money, they borrowed a lot right before the big meltdown though. They are something like 21 billion in debt if I remember correctly.

  4. ChromeWontGetYouHome says:

    Actually, Ford’s F150 series usually takes the best selling *single model/name* vehicle.

    Typically, if you combine the sales of the Silverado and Sierra 1500s, it typically is far more than Ford’s.

    There used to be a very hidden but free website that listed every model’s sales volume, monthly, year to year, etc.

  5. Discobubba says:

    CBS Sunday morning did a good piece on Ford last year.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/09/27/sunday/main5344652.shtml
    (You can find the video if you search)

    They’ve certainly been taking a their share of losses and had to make plenty of cut backs. I think the difference being they tried to adapt quicker than some of the competition. Cutting their losses and trying to survive until times are better.

    If I ever got enough extra cash I’d probably look for an old Ford Diesel Truck to fix up as a workhorse. They seem plentiful enough and parts are easy to find.

  6. dreamcatcher says:

    “…the F-100 rumors having smaller size, less weight and bigger mpg numbers…”

    Hmm, this goes against their longstanding F-series campaigns that tout their thicker steel in more places, extra tough frame, super powerful engines and transmissions that can pull tractors out of mud and dangerously oversized loads down the road. I always liked the ads where a shiny new Ford truck drives up into some construction site only to have a bucket load of stone carelessly dumped in the back (scratch, scratch, dent). Then there’s the one at the docks or whatever where some cheeky rigger cuts the line early, letting a massive roll of cable drop four foot into the truck that just bounces a little (shaken but not stirred). Good, manly stuff.

    What will the commercials be like now?

    “…hey, fellas check out our new paper thin frame…you can grow a garden in the truck bed… it comes in pink now. Ya know, for breast cancer….”

    Can’t wait.
    DC

  7. KMR says:

    New F-100 = 2011 “Global” Ranger?

    That would be awesome because the 2011 Ford Ranger that everywhere else in the world will get (but the USA) is a pretty decently spec’d mid-size truck.

    I am not a truck guy, but we need them at work for deliveries and to occasionally haul a trailer / race car. The only real option for me, since I don’t want a full size, is the Tacoma or Frontier, and I don’t like Japanese vehicles. Ideally would like the new 2011 Ford Ranger that the other countries get or the VW Amorak which isn’t coming to the USA either.

  8. DoItRite says:

    This is a REAL truck:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wg4bBPlWzT8

    Watch all three parts.

  9. Rembret says:

    No thanks, I’ll keep my Silverado.

  10. Kevin says:

    I am in the market for a new truck. Prob gonna wait for the 2011’s but man the f150’s blow the other half tons away. They ride sooo nice, love the interiors as well. At last a company that put some thought into the truck interior. Flat load floor was impressive and the space in the rear was impressive also. But the features like side steps and bed step make it much easier to get in and out of the bed. The reverse cam that come up in the nav screen was a great feature I must have. The sync nav system is maybe the best system I have ever seen on a vehicle to date and it’s on a Ford! Just unsure what engine to go for. That ecoboost sounds very impressive for a v6 and the 6.2 is a beast. Dodge, GM and Toyota are gonna have a problem making anything even close to the F150. It’s no wonder they are selling so well. I am now no longer a chevy fanboy lol

  11. JB says:

    Ford discontinued the Ranger, because the new worldwide model was larger and too close to the size of the F-150 to have it make sense in the American market. Other countries don’t have full sized pickups, so the new Ranger makes more sense.

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