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Clamp Jet’s Saw Buddy to your sheet goods when you start a cut, and it’ll support the cutoff side. This leaves your hand free to catch the other end when you finish the cut. By preventing the cutoff from twisting or bending, the Saw Buddy keeps the kerf open so it won’t pinch the saw blade, which theoretically should give you a cleaner cut.

Measuring 2″ high by 7″ wide by 6″ long, the Saw Buddy is a stainless steel spring clamp with a tongue that fits into the kerf to help keep it open. It can be used on wood, drywall, plastic, or other sheet goods up to 3/4″ thick.

Pricing starts at $12 before shipping.

Saw Buddy [Jet]
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12 Responses to Let Jet’s Saw Buddy Give You An Extra Hand

  1. Chaim says:

    Brilliant!

  2. kyle says:

    why not some paper, shims and a large binder clip for about $3.00?

  3. Joe says:

    About the right handed guy using the left handed saw…

  4. Bob says:

    I’m right handed and I bought a left handed saw just for the improved visibility of the cut. And most real (worm drive) circular saws have their blades on the left side.

  5. fred says:

    Adjustable Clamp Co (Pony Brand) used to make a clamp they called Kerf Keeper – it was their part no. 3432.
    It had a wing nut to tighten the moving parts – had a vertical piece of steel that rode in the kerf, a 3 inch wide bottom plate and top triangular shaped (in vertical cross section) plate that supported the cut panel. My inventory says that there should be at least one in the shop someplace – it was purchase before 1996 – so who knows.

  6. cjd says:

    When i cut a full sheet lengthwise, i always clamp on a quick straight edge.

    In the pic it looks like the bracket is wider than the saw’s base. Kind of making worthless, for me at least.

  7. Brau says:

    I keep something similar around – those big spring metal butterfly clips my wife gets from the Office Depot – but prefer work stands or clamping a support board underneath.

    ps. I’m calling “PhotoShop” or fakery because that cut looks way too straight to be cut freehand with a cordless trim saw.

  8. Joe says:

    A regular, ol’ clamp of almost any kind has always worked for me.

    My toolbox(es) are too big and too heavy already.

  9. Steve says:

    Why not support the sheet you are cutting correctly to start with and you don’t need to worry about one piece falling off. And the kerf won’t stay open with that device like it will with a splitter on the saw. You also could just use a shim and ad another as you get further along the cut.

    But basically this isn’t something of any value and it just another gimmick that takes up space.

  10. dotScott says:

    I think this is pretty dangerous. It looks as though you would need to start the cut, insert this device and then continue the cut while the blade is in the kerf. I’ll pass.

  11. Redbugsullivan says:

    I often work alone and bought one of these on a clearance shelf. What you can’t see is the section that keeps the two sections separate. This allows for the restart of the saw without binding or shifting. At first, I thought “dangerous” too. Then I had to cut sheets of T-111 alone. Easy to use, held securely… Saw Buddy earned its place in my toolbox. It’s a totally cool tool!

  12. Redbugsullivan says:

    I often work alone and bought one of these on a clearance shelf. What you can’t see is the section that keeps the two cut pieces separate. This allows for the restart of the saw without binding or shifting. At first, I thought “dangerous” too. Then I had to cut sheets of T-111 alone. Easy to use, held securely… Saw Buddy earned its place in my toolbox. It’s a totally cool tool!

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