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Every rose doesn’t necessarily have to have its thorn — Clauss’s rose thorn stripper lets you remove the thorns before you let your loved ones get pricked fingers. They designed the thorn stripper’s V-shaped jaws to quickly remove the thorns and leaves without damaging the stems.

One retailer claims the tool is made from from stainless steel and is rust resistant — like most marketers they leave it at that, never saying exactly what type of stainless steel. Unfortunately Clauss’s website is silent on the actual material used. They spring-load the tool so when you release the handles, it returns to the open position. If any of our readers know what the tab on the upper handle in the picture is for, please chime in.

The best deal I could find was $3 plus $6 shipping, so you might be better off browsing your local garden center than buying it online.

Thorn Stripper [Clauss]
Thorn Stripper [Knife Center]
Thorn Stripper [The Scissors Shop]

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11 Responses to Not Every Rose Has Its Thorn

  1. Prufrock says:

    Clearly the tab allows the user to maintain a grip on the tool while it is being pulled along the stem of the rose.

  2. Toolaremia says:

    What seems to be lost on the designers of this tool (and every florist I’ve ever dealt with) is that the rose it *supposed* to have thorns. The rose symbolizes love because it is stunningly beautiful, but it can hurt like hell too. That you or your lover might get pricked while exchanging a rose is meant as a reminder that love must be handled with care.

  3. Dan says:

    Do you really care what type of stainless this thing is made of? I mean do you think it is going to fall to pieces under the amazing pressures that striping thorns off roses puts on it?

  4. @Prufrock:

    Thanks, it seems obvious now that you said it.

    @Dan:

    Do you really care what type of stainless this thing is made of? I mean do you think it is going to fall to pieces under the amazing pressures that striping thorns off roses puts on it?

    No, I don’t really care in this instance, but I after seeing it for the millionth time I got annoyed. There are many different grades of stainless steel. some of them are hardly any better than bare iron.

    A casual consumer buys something that claims its made from stainless steel expecting that it won’t rust. I think it’s dishonest to play that trust to fool them into buying your product with inferior protection.

    There’s no better example then the crappy stainless steel used in cheap grills used to imitate more expensive looking grills. A consumer would be much better off with a steel covered with high temperature paint.

  5. Toolhearty says:


    Toolaremia Says:

    …That you or your lover might get pricked while exchanging a rose is meant as a reminder that love must be handled with care.

    I don’t care how “pretty” it is. Any freakin’ flower that attacks me is going to get stomped.

    🙂

  6. Blind says:

    Shouldn’t the spring loaded section have a large hole for the stem to go through so that you might pull the tool down the length of the stem? or do i not understand how it works?

  7. pascout says:

    Blind,

    The toos is used by pulling the spring end down the side of the stem.

  8. Rob says:

    “A casual consumer buys something that claims its made from stainless steel expecting that it won’t rust. I think it’s dishonest to play that trust to fool them into buying your product with inferior protection.”

    You’ll notice from your post that the claim is that it’s “rust resistant”, not rust proof. Buyers do need to read the label.

  9. aaron says:

    thank you, Toolaremia.

  10. Squidwelder says:

    Um, does anyone else think this is a joke? Really, Toolaremia, you have it. But if de-thorning is that critical, why not use a pocket knife?

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