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This probably wouldn’t pass vehicle inspection, even as farm equipment, here in Texas. On the other hand, the setting appears kind of boatish — or is that shippish?

— so maybe it doesn’t matter. But seriously this is unacceptable, and bordering on a complete travesty. Combination wrenches and electrical tape!? Are you kidding? The situation clearly calls out for a vise grip or two, duct tape, zip ties, and some paracord, probably in international orange. If you have to use electrical tape, use it for its intended purpose, like a seat belt or something.

Quit Wrenching The Steering Wheel [There, I Fixed It]

 

14 Responses to Doh! Steering Wheel No-No

  1. _Jon says:

    At least put the open-end of the wrench in the middle so you don’t gouge your hand when gripping the wheel.

  2. Dan says:

    It would be boaty

  3. MattW says:

    I would imagine that if you busted your steering wheel at sea, you would be tempted to do something like this to get back to shore.

  4. ArmchairDIY says:

    Remember, this is only temporary……unless it works.

  5. Thad E Ginatom says:

    Any self-respecting sailor would have fastened those spanners with finely-worked turk’s heads!

  6. PutnamEco says:

    Re;
    Dan Says:
    It would be boaty
    —————–
    Looks like an odometer in that speedometer, so I’m guessing agricultural.

  7. Matt says:

    odo’s sometimes have hourmeters in them…just a though (I think it looks like a boat)

  8. joe says:

    According to someone on the “There, I fixed it” thread, it’s a LARC V amphibious vehicle, which explains the boat/truck confusion.

    Is it just me, or does the gauge on the far left have antifreeze sloshing around in the bottom of it?

  9. Sean O'Hara says:

    Hmmm, I had always heard it was boat if it was under 100 feet and ship if over. Unless it’s a sub in which case its always a boat.

  10. Gordon says:

    I probably should have checked — i.e., googled — this before I “launched” the boatish/shippish thing, but here’s a definition from the web that makes sense:

    If it can be placed onto another vessel, it’s a “boat;” if not, it’s a “ship.”

    As early submarines were easily hoisted aboard submarine tenders, and later larger ones berthed on floating dry-docks, subs are called boats.

  11. PutnamEco says:

    Re:
    Gordon Says:
    If it can be placed onto another vessel, it’s a “boat;” if not, it’s a “ship.”
    ——–
    Well the MV Blue Marlin would put anything under 60,000 tons in the class of boat. So most of what the Navy uses today short of an aircraft carrier is a boat?

  12. Kevin Kadow says:

    Joe Said: Is it just me, or does the gauge on the far left have antifreeze sloshing around in the bottom of it?

    Looking at the red on the small gauge on the upper right, I’m thinking that is a reflection.

  13. Thad E Ginatom says:

    Pedants R Us Department:

    A “ship” has three or more masts, all of which carry square-rig sails.

    (my god… I nearly said sales: brain got addled by shopping)

    That is the definition. In these post-days-of-sail, it is just a matter of usage. Call big things ships!

  14. DryErase says:

    This is really a good example

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