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Besides looking cool, these hardened steel reamers from RIDGID have both an inner and outer cone so you can both ream and debur stainless steel, copper, steel, and aluminum with same tool.

The 223S has 36 cutting edges and reams/deburs pipes with diameters from 1/4″ to 1-1/4″, while the 227S has 45 cutting edges and reams/deburs pipe with diameters from 1/2″ to 2″. Both tools also have an integrated scale for determining pipe size.

RIDGID’s 223S will run you about $30, while their 227S model will run you about double at approximately $60.

Inner-Outer Reamers [RIDGID]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

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5 Responses to Ridgid Inner-Outer Reamer

  1. ttabob says:

    if they sold these at home depot, i would have one already…….but not for $35.00

  2. Shopmonger says:

    Yeah I would think there are cheaper ones out there? FRED? any of these that you guys use that may be good and a tad cheaper?

    ShopMonger
    The green Shop Site Coming soon

  3. fred says:

    Ridgid also market their #127 (34965) hand reamers that sell for about 1/2 this price

    http://www.blackbookoftools.com/ProductDetails.aspx?ProductID=97407

    We have used this variety for some years on copper tubing – but I’m not sure that it is up to the task on harder materials like Stainless Steel.

    For reaming pipe (red brass, black iron, galvanized etc.) with the pipe held in a vise – we move over to a beefier reamer – Ridgid 2-S (34955) that has a ratcheting handle. This is used to finnish up after hand cutting and threading. Our threading machines are rigged with integral – swing-away reamers.

  4. David Bryan says:

    These look like they might be better than the red ones. They’d have to be a lot better to do what they say they’ll do. I don’t know how many miles of stainless steel tubing I’ve run, 1/4 to 1 inch, .035 to .095 wall, but on every job where the company would provide a box of tools for you, they had those big red reamers in them. They’re fine for copper or pvc pipe, but for steel tubing they’re pretty much worthless. I’d just use a tapered reamer, maybe in a drill motor if I was working at a fab table. With a good tubing cutter you don’t need to worry about reaming the outside.

  5. ED says:

    I wonder how well they would work chamfering the ends of dowels.

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