jump to example.com

The first thing you do when greasing a fitting is wipe all the crud off it so you don’t pump it into the fitting — so how much time and mess could you save if the fitting was already clean?  These grease fitting covers from Caplugs fit securely over grease fittings to keep them clean and dry.

Caplugs molds the low-density polyethylene covers with an integral retaining ring that keeps the cover attached to the fitting while you’re accessing it.  They sell the grease fitting covers in black, white, red, yellow, green, and blue, which can be handy for indicating if a fitting requires a different type of grease or service interval.

Caplugs produces grease caps in two different styles.  You’ll pay about $1 for a 10-pack of the style shown above.  If you have another color in mind, call the factory — for a big enough order, they can probably oblige.

Grease Caps [Caplugs]
Street Pricing [Google]
Grease Caps [Grainger]

 

6 Responses to Protect And Identify Grease Fittings

  1. Adam R says:

    My last 3 cars haven’t even had grease fittings. Everything is sealed from the factory with no option other than rebuild or replace, not maintain. I was starting to wonder if there were still fittings on cars.

  2. Toolhearty says:

    My ’97 Ford Ranger still has 3 fittings on the front end.

    From the “grease fitting” entry on Wikipedia:

    “…in many modern applications they are falling out of use, since it has been determined by wear analysis that each new grease injection usually contains abrasive contamination, and thus service life is reduced compared to many “sealed for life” systems.”

  3. Clark F says:

    From the “grease fitting” entry on Wikipedia:

    “…in many modern applications they are falling out of use, since it has been determined by wear analysis that each new grease injection usually contains abrasive contamination, and thus service life is reduced compared to many “sealed for life” systems.”

    I dont think this applies if you properly grease something, or at least, what Ive always been taught is properly greasing. Purge all old grease until fresh grease is seen. This may not apply so much on steering parts as it does on u joints and such.

  4. Robert C says:

    Fine debris forced into a bearing is very bad for it. It may be tied with overgreasing as a killer of roler bearings.

    A sealed bearing should never be greased. Heck, a double shielded bearing shouldn’t either. Install the sealed as is and walk away. For a double shielded, pack the reservoir 80% full and then walk away.

    Over greasing a steering bearing is probaby not going to harm anything. Maybe that will even keep water out to some extent, but a high speed bearing. That is death. The grease churns, and before long, it is overheated and shoved aside. Teh bearing then runs dry.

    Also, remeber, you Aren’t really greasing a roller bearing, you are using the grease to carry the lubricant to the bearing, the oil is the key. And it only takes a small amount.

    Plain, journal, bearings are slightly different. But there is still no point in overgreasing them.

    (ICML MLA II)

  5. Toolaremia says:

    Robert C said: “[overgreasing] but a high speed bearing. That is death. The grease churns, and before long, it is overheated and shoved aside. Teh bearing then runs dry.”

    I keep telling guys doing their front wheel bearings on our race cars that filling the flipping hub with grease isn’t helping. They don’t listen. Good thing our brake rotors (integral with the hub) always crack before the bearings fail…

    As for zerks, my brand new Dodge truck has them on the front axle u-joints, along with a stern warning in the Owner’s Manual to grease them at every oil change or they will fail. I put little hoods like these on the day after I bought it. 🙂

  6. Robert C says:

    If your Dodge is 4WD you also need a grease needle for the funky u joint in the front.

    My dealer insisted that the sticker saying to lube it was a mistake, because there is no zerk.

Leave a Reply to Adam R Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *