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Think of the EZ Smart system like a sort of reverse table saw — instead of the stock moving over the saw, a circular saw runs on a track and slices up stock in a controlled, precise manner.

At the heart of the EZ system is a collection of tracks and clamps — you mount your 7-1/4” circular saw to a base plate that slides in an aluminum track.  A number of attachments and extensions allow for different sized stock in multiple setups, providing a great deal of flexibility;  it seems you can cut everything from sheet goods to trim stock.

With all the attachments, guides, and clamps, the EZ Smart system could honestly replace a table saw in some cases — but the point here is portability.  Framers throwing up a house probably won’t need this type of setup, but remodelers could benefit from it big-time.  Sure, it might take some time to set up, but the accuracy and speed it offers might be worth it to a craftsman who needs precision cut work.

The upside:  You can set up or expand the system to cover almost any length, and pack it up to go home again just as fast.  The downside:  The basic EZ Smart system — containing the saw plate, clamps, rails, and inserts — ranges in price from $158 for a 50” setup all the way up to $470 for a 200” rig.  Add to that the cost of whatever saw you might need to purchase, and you’re at portable table saw pricing.

It’s certainly not for everyone — it might work just fine, though, for someone who needs to cut stock on site but doesn’t want to haul around a huge saw.

EZ Smart Guide System [Eurekazone]

 

11 Responses to EZ Smart Saw Guide System

  1. BJN says:

    This company has a poor website. I can’t figure out what products make up the system shown in the photo above, and there’s no overview I can find on their site. I think if you’re calling your product “EZ” your website should be easy to use.

  2. Gary says:

    I’ve had the basic EZ smart system for several years. It works great for breaking down full sheets of ply, mdf or whatever – especially when your shop is in the basement. Cut it in the garage and carry the manageable pieces downstairs. Accurate, repeatable cuts with no tear out. I already had a circ saw, so the cost wasn’t too bad. The price has gone up some since I bought. If I ever need similar guides for my router, I’d look at their offerings in that space as well.

  3. Chuck says:

    I actually bought one of these systems around a year ago. The main reason was that I was building bookcases by myself that required rips of sheet goods. Essentially, it’s a lot like a Festool setup with a basic circ saw, rather than a special one.

    All that being said, it worked incredibly well. I used a Freud thin-kerf finish blade, and could cut right on the line every time. MUCH safer than me trying to manhandle sheet goods on a portable table saw.

    The bigger problem with this setup is that you have to have adequate support for the sheet that you’re cutting, or the saw will bind and jump (nothing unique there). I used their table that you build with 1×4 and ply, and it was mediocre at best.

    Overall, though, I’d give the product 4 stars out of 5.

  4. Jim says:

    Dear Chuck,

    I use the Festool system and understand your support issue. My solution is to lay the whole sheet directly onto the ground with a cheap piece of 4×8 foam insulation board underneath. I set the blade depth to cut through the sheet and slightly into the insultation. Support issue eliminated. I have been using the same sheet of foam insulation board for quite some time. JIM

  5. bob says:

    Jim’s smart

  6. Mitch says:

    Jim, that’s a very creative solution. But… don’t you get a mess with the bits of nondegradable foam spewed around?

  7. PutnamEco says:

    Another take on supporting sheets of plywood for cutting.

    http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2004/11/19/sn/

    EZ Smart does offer a table as well, Smart Table GIYF

  8. Jim says:

    Dear Mitch,

    I used a vac attached to the saw, and with the blade fully surrounded by material, pickup is almost complete. Secondly, I adjust the blade depth so it just barely goes through, maybe 1/8″, so mess is minimal and damage to the foam board is minimized. Plus, by pressing down on the foam board as you cut, tearout on the ‘down’ side is reduced.

    I have all the alternate tables and supports and the space for set-up, I just find this method the fastest, easiest and most cost effective. Rip a 4×8 panel into 2 2’x8′ panels. Your reaching, stretching, setup is a pain, you clamp the end of the guide but have to worry if the center flexes as you push the saw from afar. Making the cut on the floor is easy, just jump on and crawl across the material, great control, reduced chance of error.

    Jim

  9. jorj says:

    The ez website is better than before and a new one is overdue according to
    the posts on SMC that is now closed.
    I like the new forum with dedicated sections on each category of tools.
    Not very popular but very quick to find valuable info.
    I use the system for 3 years and I like it more with every use.
    Looks like a better way to use the system comes right after your last use.
    I like Dik’s Harrison youtube section with animated videos.
    I wished they have the videos 3 years ago.
    The name of the new ez forum is tracksawforum and eurkazoneforum.
    I invested over $2.500 over the years on the ez idea.
    I made twice my investment back from selling few older stationary tools.
    My ez favor is the B-300. that is a hinged bridge on both sides and it adjusts on any height with a simple lever.
    It’ going to take some time for the Dead Wood Concept to become popular
    but so far. I feel like a machinist using the system.

  10. Mike Butts says:

    Search YouTube for “EZ Smart” and you’ll find over 100 videos that demonstrate the system far better than the manufacturer’s website.

  11. Bob Mosinski says:

    Just use the foam as Jim described and put a piece on each side of your cut line. Leaving enough room for the blade of course…no mess and no fuss. Simple. Plus your foam sheets last as long as you do. :o)

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