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Granite is becoming a popular material for the workshop.  It’s dimensionally stable and corrosion-free, and its polished, slick surface makes it ideal for machine tables, but is it a good material for precision measuring tools?  Steel City seems to think so — they’re selling an angle gauge made from it.

They machine this solid black granite angle gauge to a perpendicular accuracy of .001″ and a tolerance of 0.1° over the entire length of the 45° edge.  Since black granite is the densest granite, you’re not going to see much change over temperature and humidity extremes.

You can purchase this granite angle gauge with its carrying case at Woodcraft for $20.

Steel City Tool Works [Website]
Granite Angle Gauge [Woodcraft]

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6 Responses to Everything Is Better In Granite?

  1. Shopmonger says:

    I want one, just to say I have one,,,, and it looks good for machine setup

  2. threebean says:

    I would like it – from the standpoint of having a shop in a garage that is used throughout the year so my iron tools end up with rust on them. The only downside is that i tend to drop things, so i wonder how long it would stay in one piece.

  3. Stuart D says:

    Since black granite is the densest granite, you’re not going to see much change over temperature and humidity extremes.

    Actually, unless I’m mistaken, granite’s dimensional stability has nothing to do with its density. A large ratio of granite’s composition is silica, which has an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient. As for humidity, granite is non-porous, so there’s no means by which water can be trapped inside.

    Anyways, I don’t think I would use something like this as I would be too afraid of chipping or otherwise damaging it.

  4. @Stuart D:

    You may be right about density and dimensional stability. I think I misinterpreted the information on the Woodcraft site — although checking back at the original text they seem to imply it.

    Maybe they’re trying to claim that the denser granite can be ground to higher tolerances than a less dense (and maybe coarser) granite.

  5. Stuey says:

    Ben,

    I think that they’re implying that a granite gauge is more accurate than a homemade wooden one, or perhaps even commercially available steel or plastic gauges as well.

  6. PeterP says:

    All I know is that the Steel City granite table saw is sweet. Dunno if it’s worth it, but sweet anyway.

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