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If your sweet ride is giving you heavy drama, you might want to consider asking it what’s wrong.  Sounds stupid, but that’s basically what happens when you plug in an OBD unit like the 3110 CANOBD2 from Equus — it hooks in and reads the trouble codes in the vehicle computer.  Think Star Trek, except it won’t be fixed in 45 minutes, plus commercials.

The days of checking the carburetor or replacing the distributor cap are gone — you won’t find a carburetor in a lot of newer cars, and sometimes there’s no distributor cap, either.   While some of the old-school shade-tree crowd just back away slowly, the others grab for a reader like the 3110 that decodes “Check Engine” warnings on any 1996 and newer vehicle. It refreshes the data every 30 seconds when connected to the vehicle, and it features an all-in-one LED screen display for quick emissions checks.

The unit runs about $130 and can save you a bunch more than that in repair bills if you’re willing to get your hands dirty and tackle the problems yourself.

3110 CANOBD2 [Equus]
Street Pricing [Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

 

16 Responses to Equus 3110 Diagnostic Code Scanner

  1. Jim German says:

    I was actualy just looking for a scanner, anyone see any real reason to buy this one instead of the cheaper 3030?

  2. Sean says:

    I’ve just been looking as well. This looks comparable to the Actron 9175 that I had considered, but now I think I might go with the ScanGuage II. It will clear codes and reset the Check Engine light, but it also looks good enough to mount in the dash for everyday use. More here:

    http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/car/8426/
    http://www.scangauge.com/features/

  3. Sean says:

    I’ve just been looking as well. This looks comparable to the Actron 9175 that I had considered, but now I think I might go with the ScanGuage II. It will clear codes and reset the Check Engine light, but it also looks good enough to mount in the dash for everyday use. More here:

    thinkgeek.com/gadgets/car/8426/
    scangauge.com/features/

  4. rg says:

    You may also be interested in an interface that plugs into a USB port on a laptop, or uses Bluetooth. That way you have your choice of software as well. Here’s an example of what I mean:
    http://www.obd2allinone.com/

  5. Fabian says:

    I have a laptop scanner and they are a pain in the rear to setup and use.. luggin a laptop around.. I tried this and it was lame.

    These scanners are worth their weight in gold so you can tell your mechanic to go suck it when he tries to pull a fast one on you.

    F.

  6. Shopmonger says:

    I had the predicessor to this model and I loved it. (should not have given it to a friend) I have access now to Modus so it is ahrd ot get away from. But hese are great and easy to use. I had all my emplyees using one within a day to help customer with diag problems..

    P.S. TOOL TALK PODCAST 43????????? hellooooooooo

  7. Kris says:

    Jim German – on the Amazon site at the end of the product description there is a link to a comparison chart of the various Equus OBD scanners.

  8. Kris says:

    BTW, the picture is of the Equus 3120 – a more advanced and expensive model than the 3110.

  9. Chris says:

    Fabian: if you need one of these to tell whether your mechanic is lying to you, you probably need a new mechanic.

    cl

  10. jeff says:

    Whenever I need one of these, I just go to Checker and use theirs for free. Many parts places do this.

  11. Sean says:

    @jeff:

    That’s what I used to do, but apparently California passed a law recently disallows the auto parts stores from providing diagnosis services. My local AutoZone is selling the rest of the scanners that they have in stock, but don’t intend to reorder them (they aren’t in the inventory computer anymore!).

  12. jeff says:

    @Sean:

    Any idea what the purpose is to that law? It sounds like more of a hindrance to people than a help.

  13. Sean says:

    @jeff:

    I haven’t looked at it myself, but the AutoZone guys seemed to think it was the result of lobbying by the auto mechanics who were annoyed that they don’t get to charge $75 to customers wanting their Check Engine light reset. I guess I’d be happy about it if I were a professional mechanic, but as a consumer/user it annoys me.

  14. rbb says:

    For 96+ Volkwagens & Audis, nothing (with the exception of VW VAG tools, which cost $$$ and are not available to the average Joe) comes close to the VCDS tool from http://www.ross-tech.com

  15. Uthor says:

    rbb, I was going to post that. I’ll probably be getting a VAG-COM for my GTI sometime next year. Not only does it can and clear codes, but it allows you to change settings in the car to turn on and off option that are normally found in different countries. Do you want to control your windows with your remote? Turn off the DRL? Use a European-style headlight switch that allows the use of parking lights? VAG-COM!

  16. dexter says:

    Costco is selling the Codekey for 39.95, much more affordable and it gives the codes and resets the engine light.

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