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It’s been a busy week here at Toolmonger. If you’ve been spending time in the shop — you should! — and you haven’t had a chance to keep up with Toolmonger this week, we suggest you start with these posts, which our readers helped to select:

Chuck Micro Drill Bits
You can try to chuck a #61 bit in a 1/2″ chuck, but it’s probably an exercise in futility — the chucks just aren’t designed to hold such small bits.  To make centering their (and other companies’) micro drill bits a lot easier, Gyros makes a mini drill bit adapter.  This adapter’s 1/8″ shank also allows you to chuck these micro bits in a rotary tool like a Dremel.

Hands-Free Board Bender
As the quality of lumber drops, manufacturers respond by giving us tools to deal with these less-than-ideal timbers.  Stanley designed their 93-310 board bender to help you handle twisted construction materials — if you need to straighten deck boards or joists, this is your tool.

Hot or Not? LeafGuard Gutter System
Finding lawn care distasteful in almost all its forms, we spend most of our time plotting ways to get out of tasks like cleaning gutters — one such method would be the LeafGuard system.  This gutter cover lets water in but keeps most leaves and debris out.

Free-handing a straight cut with a reciprocating saw isn’t the easiest task, but why freehand when you can attach the Mighty-Miter from Seatek?  Make right-angle miters in tubing, wood or plastic molding, angle iron, EMT, allthread, or just about any material your reciprocating saw can cut, as long as it’s between 3/16″ and 2″.

Preview: Stanley’s Fire/Rescue Fubar
If the regular Fubar is the schoolyard bully, the new Fire/Rescue Stanley Fubar is the guy who beats him up and steals his lunch money — it’s a bruiser, beefier and pumped up in almost every area.  First responders (police/fire/EMT’s) designed this new member of the Fubar fold for forcible entry, vehicle extrication, and extreme demolition.

Help us choose next week’s Top 5!

We’d appreciate your help in choosing next week’s Top 5, which’ll be featured here, elsewhere, and in the podcast as well. While you’re reading TM this week, look out for the “Interesting Post” button at the bottom of the article:

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When you see an article that piques your interest, click the button once. You’ll return to the same page, but TM’s software’ll score your click for future reference. We’ll check in on the totals before selecting next week’s Top 5.

 

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