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Denny and Kathy, who seem to run an Ace Hardware dealership, are selling the Fiskars 8511 hand drill for $10.79.  The Fiskars — a basic, small, cheap, eggbeater-style hand drill — works well for small jobs where there’s no need for a cordless drill. Of course, you can often find a vintage one on Ebay for about the same price.

Fiskars 8511 Hand Drill [Denny and Kathy’s]
Street Pricing [Google Products]

 

12 Responses to Dealmonger: Fiskars Hand Drill $10.79

  1. joe says:

    Oh man, I hate, hate, hate these drills.

    They have such promise. They’re so damn cool looking, have great ergonomics, and turning that crank gives you the feeling that you’re operating some serious precision gearing.

    Then you try to drill into something tougher than, say, yogurt, and that plastic crank handle snaps clean off. I’ve done it, my dad’s done it, my 12 year old niece did it once drilling into a block of cedar. That ‘lifetime warranty’ does come in handy, but when a little girl calls a tool “cheap crap”, you tend to give up.

  2. Wing says:

    I second the opinion. While I haven’t broken mine, it is quite useless when it encounters resistance as it is hard to apply any appreciable amount of torque. It also tends to overtighten the chuck when that happens, making the drill bit difficult to remove.

  3. David Bryan says:

    I used one of these once to make a 1/4″ hole in a breaker box. Then I used a 1/2″ diameter knockout punch to enlarge the hole so I could use a 3/4″ conduit-sized knockout punch. I’ve definitely had higher quality tools, but these have done whatever I’ve asked of them. I’ve had 3, I think, and gave 2 away and still have the first one I bought. My only problem with this tool is the chuck backs off when you reverse it, but you can stick a locknut on it and that helps fix that problem. But then again, Joe’s 12-year-old niece could probably whup my butt.

  4. Barri says:

    Why on earth would you ever use one of these over a drill other than to wear your arm out??

  5. Coach James says:

    I have one of these that I’ve used for several years with no problems. I don’t drill concrete with it, but softwood and drywall I do. I go a little slower with less pressure than my corded or cordless drills and it works fine.

  6. jeff says:

    I somehow smashed my toenail back in the day. I used a fiskars to drill through the nail and relieve the pressure. Worked like a charm since I needed to go slow and apply almost zero downward pressure. There was no way I was going to use my power drill for self surgery.

  7. dan says:

    I have a craftman version of the same thing. Works great. Does not feel like it is to tough but it has not broke yet. It cuts surprisingly fast. Also it is much smaller then a power drill so it can go in spots that would be hard to reach.

  8. rob says:

    I used one of these just last week to drill small holes in aluminum pipe. because it requires less pressure and slower speed I was able to make more accurate holes.

  9. luckychucky says:

    I’ve gone through two of these. The gearing is made of plastic, so if you apply any kind of torque at all the gears strip out. Since it can’t be opened for repair, at that point the whole device goes straight to the landfill. It’s really frustrating. I ended up with a Schroeder hand drill instead, which I utterly adore. The Shroeder costs more but it has become one of my all-time favorite tools. It’s got a real beautiful simplicity like Shaker furniture- a masterpiece of nasic design – and it will last a few lifetimes. I have to agree with the first comment in this thread: the Fiskars hand drill shows so much promise, and regrettably only delivers so much suck.

  10. luckychucky says:

    I’ve gone through two of these. The gearing is made of plastic, so if you apply any kind of torque at all the gears strip out. Since it can’t be opened for repair, at that point the whole device goes straight to the landfill. It’s really frustrating. I ended up with a Schroeder hand drill instead, which I utterly adore. The Shroeder costs more but it has become one of my all-time favorite tools. It’s got a real beautiful simplicity like Shaker furniture- a masterpiece of basic design – and it will last a few lifetimes. I have to agree with the first comment in this thread: the Fiskars hand drill shows so much promise, and regrettably only delivers so much suck.

  11. MIKE says:

    THIS DRILL IS A LIFE SAVER FOR US FOR THE JOB THAT WE DO. I WORK FOR A PUMPING SERVICE WHERE WE PUMP CEMENT THROUGH A CEMENT HEAD THAT REQUIRES US TO USE A SMALL WIRE COMING FROM THE TOP OF THE HEAD TO TILL WHETHER THE PLUG HAS LEFT OR NOT. THIS SMALL HOLE ALLOWS THE WIRE TO LEAVE THE HEAD TO INDICATE IT HAS LEFT WHEN WE START DISPLACEMENT. IF THIS SMALL RUBBER HOLE IS NOT CLEAR OF CEMENT WE CAN NOT DO THIS. THE HOLE IS ABOUT 3/16 WIDE ABOUT 1-4 INCH DEEP. THIS DRILL IS A PERFECT ADDITION TO MY TOOL BOX DO TO THE FACT IF I EVER HAVE TO LOAD A HEAD ON A LOCATION I CAN PULL MY TRUSTY LITTLE DRILL TO PUNCH A HOLE AND FEED THE WIRE THROUGH. IT IS NO BATTERIES REQUIRED, EASY TO USE AND DEPENDABLE. IT BEATS HAVING TO LOOK FOR A PICK OR THE SMALLEST SCREW DIVER I GOT TO PUNCH THAT HOLE WITHOUT MISSING UP THE RUBBER SEAL IN THE PROCESS.

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