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In 2001 members of the Air Force’s 820th Security Forces commissioned Ryan M. Johnson to revive 18th-century battle axes with the aid of 21st-century technology — the result is the RMJ line of tactical tomahawks. RMJ forged each axe from a single piece of tool steel to provide military personnel with a tough fighting and utility axe that can be counted on.

Like a good knife, a good tomahawk can prove useful in many ways to a soldier/airman/marine in the field. The 18″-long tool features a 3″ striking edge and a 3″ spike that can puncture body armor — you might also employ it in less lethal operations such as climbing, digging, forced entry, and search and rescue operations. The Eagle Talon version comes flat-ground on the striking side for general cutting while the beard is hollow-ground for ripping…gulp.  RMJ applies a corrosion-resistant finish for long life in harsh environments.

I usually don’t go for these high-dollar specialty items (I’m a superknife man myself), but the quality and finish of this item really caught my eye. RMJ charges $360 when it’s in stock, which it’s currently not. Military and civilian first-responders get $55 off.

RMJ Tactical [Official Site]
RMJ Forge [Historic Axes]

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11 Responses to RMJ Tactical Tomahawk: Badass

  1. Dano says:

    I saw this Tomahawk on the a show about axes on the History channel. The guy attacked a car and used it as a can opener to cut out chunks. He also gashed his arm in the process.

  2. Fong says:

    Modern Marvels…I saw it too. It’s amazing how far design and fabrication methods have come along since the first primitive axes but it’s also fascinating that the basic “technolgy” (i.e. wedge on handle) is essentially unchanged.

  3. Davo says:

    Nice. What I would like to see, is a high-quality, Tactical Mace…for demolition purposes, of course…

  4. Justin Brashear says:

    The Air Force??? Really?

  5. Eric Dykstra says:

    yup, the air force

    The Air Force Security Forces are ground forces that secure and protect Bases, Aircraft and nuclear weapons. They perform a similar job as the Army’s military police.

    Some of the more elite Airmen are tasked with parachuting into unfriendly places and securing airstrips before they start shipping in the expensive equipment. For the most part they are trained by the Army and as all around BMFs.

    Official Site: http://tinyurl.com/6fez9e
    Wikipedia Article: http://tinyurl.com/6kxu7d

  6. Spyder says:

    The guys who go in and do covert ops (parachuting in to secure the landing zone) aren’t SP’s – they are called Combat Controllers, and they train with the elite Special Forces from all the other services, including the Green Berets and the SEALs. These are also guys who are trained to make entry by helo or parachute in the middle of the night, find an observation point, verify target locations and defensive posture, and “paint” said targets with laser designators for the flyers to hit with laser guided ordnance, then sneak out again.

    Some of the CC’s are also highly specialized – for instance, every CC team has a few ground controllers – basically guys trained to jump in, prepare the ground, then operate as air traffic controllers (complete with field radar) for a patch of nothing in the middle of nowhere that we just happen to want to put a much of heavy stuff on.

  7. CATM MAN says:

    Spyder,

    I’m an AF Combat Arms Instructor, holding 2 AFSC‘s, one being SF. 18 years of active duty. That being said:

    Some of us here are glad your such a pro on AF SF and their AFSC. You seem to be a pro on other AF AFSC’s as well.

    Where to start…Security Police (SP), now called AF Security Forces (SF). SF are classified as military police (3P0X1‘s). SF includes, Combat Arms(3P051B/312SEI) & K9 (3P0X? Puppy pushers). SF conducts Law Enforcement & Force Protection for any and all military assets, up to and including Nukes. SF in general are not masters of any one skill set, but are a jack of all trades and are classified as Military Police/Light Infantry in DoD. And we play that role well. Next time you watch CNN, you might see AF strips on that troops ABU’s, we tend to look like Army currently when were running convoys and policing various pie holes around the globeJ

    The AF 820 SF Group, are rare group of what boils down to as Air Force Airborne Military Police. Some of these troops are Ranger certed. Some have attended CPEC. All are jump certed. They DO jump into hostile combat zones, secure air fields(primary task), conduct combat patrol behind the wire, etc. They are highly motivated hand selected SF members…And in most instances are the experts/creame of the crop of SF.

    Though I’m not a CC expert by any means—Air Force Combat Controllers…Some of what you state is true about CC’s, however:
    They don’t really train with Elite Special Forces as I believe you’re implying, as THEY ARE ELITE SPECIAL FORCES. And they are ALL VERY specialized. 2 year tech school if I recall?
    Every CC team has a few ground controllers??? Wow, they are ground controllers (Hence Name)!
    They don’t capture air fields, that’s Rangers. Can be the SF820th(gasp) or whoever else gets tasked…
    CC’s do set up and direct air field ops, direct air strikes, conduct covert strikes as a 2 man teams, but more often than not are paired with other branches to direct air traffic/strikes if I‘m not mistaken. They can be inserted by land, sea or air. They are Air Force Air Borne troops…Their training mirrors another Air Force Spec Ops field known as Para Rescue. Except they break apart at a certain point during training, one takes extensive med training and sea operations…The other directs aircraft.
    AF Air Borne Red Horse sets up and builds Air Fields BTW, along with Army engineers & Navy SeaBees.…Not CC’s
    You saying CC’s jump in and start digging runways is like saying SEALS Build sea ports.
    From the sound of it, you’ve been jacked up one to many times by a SF member.

    • ONE says:

      It is my understanding that Security Forces do not hold the title of Police because the training they recieve is not adequate to warrant such a title. At no point could I reference in the 2nd previous paragraph above where Spyder stated that Combat Controllers dig runways. It seems as if you are trying to over glorify the position of simple security guard. I am sure that some Security Forces posess special skill sets but a jack of all trades I highly doubt. Just for the record I have never had any run in with any SF personel so my reply holds no biast.Now on the other hand I have plenty of my brothers that have had the pleasure to work with some CC’s and in many cases have possibly had their lives and the lives of their brothers saved in various fire fights in the sand box. So with all that being said everyone should be proud of their job but don’t try to make what you do sound as if it requires the same caliber of soldiers as the Seals, Green Berets, PJ’s/ CC’s or MARSOC requires.

  8. slvrnss says:

    I can appreciate edged weapons more than most. I’ve been a knife enthusiast since I was a young lad, but that tomahawk is still ridiculously expensive.

  9. Chaz says:

    Yeah, the airforce! Its funny when civilians perceptions of the military are false. The US Air Force actuallynhas special forces as well. Who are typically on enemy territory BEFORE even the Navy seals. Youve all been brain washed to believe that Delta, the SEALS, Green Berets are the ONLY badass organizations in the US Special Force arsenal….surprise,they’re not!
    AIRFORCE black diamonds….something youll never really hear about. And they prefer it that way.

  10. STEELE says:

    1st of all to all of you in any service both here and over there Thank you all. It could be said that even this open forum is made possible by YOU!!! But I must add GO ARMY all Dad was a Drill Sgt lol. To my point though has anyone held or used this very nice looking hawk? Like some id like to hear a very good reason for its price as iv held and used hawks by SOG and a few others mainly in camp situations but also throwing for fun and some combat type use Iv seen these made and they are stamped out 2 at a time. I hope this isnt a case of this company chargeing what it does due to the military because even at a discount for them its still kinda high. Like to hear from a person who used it while deployed.

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