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Buildex’s new Tapcon line of anchors cut their own threads as you drive them into masonry.  And unlike most other types of masonry anchors, they’re removable.

You especially appreciate ‘removable’ when you’ve driven a bunch of anchors into a wall, then decided to rearrange or adjust your setup.  With most anchors, you’re, um, screwed.  But with Tapcons you just pull out the screw, fill in the hole with concrete patch paste, paint it, and you’re good to go.

Be careful, though: new Tapcon users often over-tighten the anchor, loosening its grip in the masonry.  You can use a drill/driver, but be sure to set the clutch to a low torque setting — and use very low speeds.  Or you can shell out for the Condrive 100, which automatically disengages at optimal tightness.

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Of course, if you need a really heavy-duty masonry anchor, go with the regular kind.  But for most projects, Tapcon’s pretty blue screws do the trick.  And they’re made in the good ole’ USA.

Note: I’ve yet to try the Kwik-Con series of anchors, a competing product line.  If you’ve used both brands and noticed a difference, drop us a comment about it.

Tapcon Anchors [ITW Buildex]
Condrive Installation Tools [ITW Buildex]
Street Pricing [Google Products]

 

7 Responses to Tapcon Removable Masonry Screws

  1. Yuppers says:

    I used these once and found they seem to work well except you have to make sure the drill bit does not wobble and goes in straight. If you don’t the hole get oversized and there is nothing for the threads to bite into. The first holes I drilled got stripped out very easily when I when to screw the fasteners in. They stripped even before I got to torquing them down. I also made sure I had the correct bit for the tapcom size.

  2. Tom says:

    tapcon’s aren’t removable? I have removed them from cinderblock and concrete before.

    Couple of hints when using them:
    -watch out for re-rod it will trash your masonry bit. Maybe it was the cheap bit that came with them?
    -the hex head ones are way easier to tighten

  3. Tapcons are most definitely removable. But, usually once you remove a Tapcon, the hole is left carved out a bit more and you must either drill a new mounting point or use a different type of anchor.

    For cinder block, if I need to use the same mounting point, I like to use Cobra’s fancy shmancy anchors that are available at Lowes. The largest size corresponding to size 12 screws requires a redrilling, but is one of few removable options for this type of wall, although with a slight strength tradeoff.

    http://toolmonger.com/2007/08/29/plastic-anchors-with-a-difference/

  4. Michael Silva says:

    I’ve been using Tapcons for years both home and work use. They are fast, easy and if you use enough of them they can hold a heck of a lot of weight. They are great, the only downside is exactly what Yuppers said….the bit has to go perfectly straight, if the hole is at all oversized the Tapcon won’t hold.

  5. Robert says:

    I have used these for years, mounting signs to brick, block, and tilt up walls. They are quick and easy, and leave a small hold should you need to remove them. Just be sure to drill the hole deep enough so the screw doesn’t bottom out. Most of the time I have no trouble drilling, I usually don’t encounter rebar. Use a hammer drill for the hole, and just run the screw up until it’s snug. They are very strong in shear, the pull out strenght depends on the strenght of the masonry they are installed in. If it’s a brick wall, try to mount in the brick, and not the mortar, the morter is weak.

  6. Kathleen says:

    I was installing kitchen cabinets to a concrete wall.
    After I purchasing the Tapcon and bits I noticed the bits were bent.
    I went back to Lowe’s to exchange them. I checked them all and they all had a slight bend in them. The Lowe’s employee told me that they all wobble to let the concrete dust will come out.
    This is not the first time I’ve used Tapcons and I’ve never heard this before.
    Is this true or did the employee think I was an idiot woman and made up this little tale?
    I know that if the hole is too large the screw won’t hold properly.
    P.S. I want to Home Depot and bought straight bits.

  7. bi says:

    No masonary bit should be “bent”.

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