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Welding is a skill that’s incredibly useful and a lot of fun, too.  We’ve written quite a bit about it — including a few projects you might want to try — but today I ran across a great “getting started” guide from the people over at Custom Classic Trucks.  Like us, they’re enamoured with the MIG/wire process, which is way, way easier than stick welding.  So if you’ve tried stick welding and hated it, you might want to give wire welding a chance.  Try it — you’ll like it!

Their how-to features the Millermatic 140 — a small, capable, and affordable MIG welder that’d make an excellent choice for an enthusiastic home/garage hobbyist — and walks you through selecting equipment, setting it up properly, and making welds, all with lots of pictures.

The Garage Guy’s Guide To Welding [Custom Classic Trucks]

 

5 Responses to How To Get Started MIG Welding

  1. PeterP says:

    Thats awesome. I just bought a mig welder and I’ve been struggling with learning the basics. Thanks for the pointer!

  2. Steve says:

    I picked up an old stick welder at a farm sale a while ago and it’s worked ok so far, but I’d prefer to try amig. Thanks to harbor Freight I might get my chance if i can scratch together the green.

  3. Brent says:

    Thanks a lot, this is great.

    I just picked up a Lincoln Ranger 10,000 for a song, that I will resell to get a 140, which works much better for me.

    Keep up the good work.

  4. Scraper says:

    Thanks for the posting this. Welding is one area that I am eager to learn more about. After reading this, I think I may actually be able to do it.

  5. Jason says:

    For a bargain keep an eye on your local craiglist page. I was forced to sell a Lincoln 110V MIG setup (complete with gas bottle) about a year ago and the buyer got it for less than half of brand new. I would bet plenty of people think they’re going to get into welding then never use their new toy so they sell almost new units cheap.

    Once you have a welder check with your local welding shop for practice material. The one near where I used to live had a huge dumpster in the parking lot and they said I could take what I want since it cost them money to have it hauled away. The more I took the less it would cost them. I never took enough to make a real dent in their costs but it was still a great resource for me. And what they call “scrap” is usually enough for the DIYer’s projects and then some. And there’s new stuff in there every few days so it’s always fun to stop by.

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