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In Use

When we first heard the Cat diesel run, we instantly understood why so many customers opt for it.  From a practical perspective, you’d probably want to choose the gas or diesel engine based on the type of fuel you have around your ranch (or whatever location you’re using it).  For example, if you were running around a stadium, you’d probably have easier access to gas.  For the ranch — especially if you have other industrial equipment — you’ll have plenty of diesel available.  But practicality aside, many will buy the diesel simply because it sounds mean as hell — less like a toy and more like equipment if you catch our drift.  That said, the engine’s not overly loud; one can carry on a conversation with a passenger without yelling.

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Our first big surprise driving the Cub UV was the suspension feel — it really absorbs the bumps, making it feel more like a large ATV with a steering wheel than a small truck.  But while the ride’s soft, the steering is quite linear and responsive.  It’s easy to control, yet it’ll run over some pretty serious terrain.

The CVT is quite responsive as well, and the combination of the Cat engine and CVT make for a really torquey package — we suspect that the factory towing numbers are pretty conservative.

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Though we didn’t do any extreme off-roading with it, we noticed that the Cub’s got lots of clearance in the front and rear and should be able to handle quite steep grades and dropoffs. 

Accessories

Almost as interesting as the vehicle itself are the dozens of accessories Cub offers straight from the dealer.  The list is too long to publish here, but here are some highlights:

  • Soft- and hard-side doors
  • Acrylic and glass windshields
  • Soft and hard roofs
  • Windshield wipers
  • A light bar
  • Aluminum wheels
  • A radio (mounted overhead)
  • A horn
  • A snow blade
  • A hood rack
  • A winch
  • Seat covers

And many more.  If those aren’t enough for you, each Cub Cadet dealer received a single “pimped-out” special edition UV for 2007 which includes most of the factory options plus stainless steel brake lines, adjustable shocks, custom paint, custom seat covers, and custom-painted aluminum wheels. 

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These SE models are easy to find — just check out the showroom floor at any Cub Cadet dealer.

Pricing

The Cat-equipped model we tested starts at around $8,800 — about $1,500 more than the gas-powered equivalent and about $1,200 less than the special edition.  Just like with cars, pricing varies significantly with location and options, so you’ll want to visit your local dealer for specifics.

Read on to page 3 for our conclusions. 

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3 Responses to Hands-On: Cub Cadet’s 4×4 Utility Vehicle

  1. nrChris says:

    I wish that I had a need for this, but in that price range the only purchase that I’d be willing to make would be for a nice used Ducati. That being said, my lot is a quarter acre, so the Cub is an unneeded pipe dream. I would, however, be more in the market for a single wheel powered wheel barrow.

  2. ambush27 says:

    this reminds me of the john deer gator 6×4

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