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We picked up some of these plastic 1-quart mixing containers recently for use in mixing Bondo Glass — mainly because we’re lazy and figured at $0.75 each we could just pitch ’em instead of trying to clean ’em.  But just a week later they’re in use all over the shop.  Hell, we ended up running back and picking up a dozen of ’em to keep in the cabinet for later.

Besides acting as calibrated (and cheap) mixing containers, they’re great for holding small parts while you’re working on something — did I mention that the ones we have fit perfectly into most car cupholders? — or for holding a few pencils and pens on the workbench.  I grabbed one the other day to carry a bunch of small pieces of sandpaper from the cabinet to where I was working.  Seriously, if you don’t have a few of these in your shop, pick a few up.  You’ll thank us later.

They’re available at the big-box retailers, most hardware stores, and pretty much any place that sells paint.  (They work great as a small, disposable paint reservoir, too.)  And if you need something larger, most places carry a 5-quart and a 10-quart as well, though the small ones seem to offer the most general utility.

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6 Responses to Finds: 1 Qt. Mixing Containers

  1. mike says:

    i like the ones with the gradations if you need to measure, but if you just need cheap plastic containers, they come free with yogurt. (something you should be eating more of anyway — probiotics!)

  2. nrChris says:

    I agree with Mike. We come up with a lot of useful plastic containers by walking up to the recycling bin and pulling something out. Mixing is a fine application, but I find myself doing more small part organizing when I am assembling / tearing something down. Also, you don’t have to feel bad about throwing something away that you already used twice.

  3. Eli says:

    I buy sleeves of food grade containers from Smart and Final (round with lids) and use them in the house for tupperware and in the shop for nails, paint, and mixing. But of course now I feel bad for not recycling more containers I’ve used already. Kudos for getting in early with the eco-pitch fellas.

  4. Paul says:

    Ha! Empty brain food containers for 75 cents a pop. I think not! Get a grip. Toolmongers shouldn’t be shelling out their hard earned toolbux on empty plastic containers in a modern industrialized society. Thankfully everyone that has replied to this knows where such resources can be had for free.

  5. Quentin says:

    I find these totally useful as well, but I don’t spend a dime (or 0.75 in this case) on them. I use my old yogurt/cottage cheese/sour cream/etc containers.

    They’re also great for painting. Pour a little latex/oil in there and use them while cutting in.

  6. Paul says:

    Why does everyone like round containers? I find more squared off containers to be a much more useful shape. I really like cut up 1/2 gallon plastic milk bottles myself. Gallon ones aren’t too bad either.

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