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You’ve got a big-ass belt sander for big projects, but if you’re like us, you’re still stuck sanding by hand when there’s detail work to be done.  For those smaller jobs, Proxxon offers a sweet little belt sander for finishing, mortising, and fine polishing of flat surfaces – the 115/E. 

It features a die-cast aluminum head holding the sanding arm — which swivels 60º and locks in place — and an electronic speed control that tames the belt speed between 700 m/min to 300 m/min.  The best part: You can change the belt in a matter of seconds.

It’s not something everyone in the world would need, but it’s handy for small flat surfaces where a Dremel isn’t enough and a large belt sander is overkill (or just won’t fit).

Street pricing starts at $139.

Belt Sander [Proxxon]
Street Pricing [Froogle]

 

10 Responses to Finds: A Belt Sander That’s All About The Details

  1. nrChris says:

    Seems like overkill to me, I guess I would need a really specific application that required this tool. One that I could not get with my belt sander, palm sander, mouse, sandpaper, or dremel tool.

    Seems like dremel could easily make a mini-belt sander adapter, too–which would beat the price point.

  2. Stuart says:

    the belt sander looks good but it’s they type of thing only a pro could justify with regular use. And it probably is the sort of tool you couldn’t live without once you owned one.

    On another topic, Peg Board. IT SUCKS! Sorry to peg board enthusiasts but I hate it because the tools tend to pull the hooks out when you remove them. If you are using tools constantly you want a faster way of retrieving them and putting them away. Yes there are plastic clips that hold the pegs in place but you might as well hammer some nails in a bit of plywood and be done with it. And don’t even get me started on tracing the tools and storing old rusty hardware in baby jars screwed to a cupboard… Rant over.

    Stuart – peg free

  3. James says:

    If a Dremel is too small and a belt sander is too big, why not get a sanding drum and use a drill or drill press? It’s a lot cheaper.

    Also, I agree with Stuart. There was a lot of pegboard in my house when I bought it and I even went out and got a kit with all the different pieces, including the plastic clips.

    The plastic clips slightly reduced the frustration, but I was still left with the layout problem. Getting everything to fit without overlap was an annoying exercise that I had to go through every time I bought a new tool. Eventually, it got so that I often had to remove two or three tools to get at the one I wanted. The only parts I was satisfied with were the screwdriver holders, and you could easily do that effectively with a piece of wood with a series of holes.

    When I ripped my basement apart to create a big shop, I put the pegboards aside to put back up when I was finished. Later on, I came to my senses and threw them out with the rest of the debris.

    Hopefully, I’ll get the shop finished soon (I just got my Fuego the other day and it rocks!) and I can start in on organisation that won’t drive me up the wall. I plan on building the rolling tool chest from ShopNotes 79 first, and then a few other projects, also from ShopNotes.

    Now all I need is time…

    James – also peg free 🙂

  4. lmgreco says:

    I have used something similar to this for a while for hard to reach places on metal work. If used properly, it can get some nice results. This looks expecially useful because of the swivel head.

    Dynafile is the tool I am more familiar with:
    http://www.pathon.com/dynafile.htm

  5. T says:

    I’ve used the dynafile as well. We had them at the place I worked two jobs ago. They were absolutely fantastic for taking off burrs left over from the machine shop. Use the dynafile to get the big stuff off and a scotch brite wheel in an air grinder to smooth it out. I can’t telll you how many things would have never fit together without that combination. Especially handy for redressing big long screwed up stub acme and acme threads, which we used all the time.

    Of course, like all power tools, you can take too much material off really fast.

  6. Bruce says:

    I’ve used the dyna-file which is a similar tool in metal fabricating. You can get scotch brite belts as well as sanding belts. I’ve never seen a tool that works as well for blending welds to the base metal. Once you’ve used one you will be spoiled on it.

  7. Paul says:

    I have a couple of belt sanders this size, and I don’t use them very much. I use my big belt sanders a lot, and rotary sanders a lot too. And nothing replaces hand sanding I don’t care how many sanders you got. There’s just no getting away from hand sanding. A strip of sandpaper can usually do what one of these things will do. And running these thin belts they pop apart a lot so you’ll soon have lots of strips of sandpaper. Maybe these tools are just sandpaper strip makers? A cute gee whiz tool that you may use a lot the day that you get it, but less and less as time passes.

    I don’t feel these are essential tools, They look far handier than they are in practice. I feel that someone’s toolbux are better spent other ways.

  8. Dave says:

    These sanders are incredibly usefull if you do a lot of detail work. Unlike dremmels that gouge little pits or run-off and unlike big belt sanders that can turn a tree into a toothpick in 30 seconds or less, this type of sander can be easily controlled to sand on a flat and even plane. As for breaking the belts, you are twising the sander against the surface of your work or appying too much preassure.

    Peg boards don’t suck. Put a little square on the support leg at the bottom of the peg and they stay nicely secured to the board but are still easy to rearrange (unlike nails).

  9. steve says:

    im a woodcarver and I do very detailed work,this little sander makes fast time sanding on work that would take me hours by hand,has spoiled me,wouldnt be without it now

  10. Gary Jacobs says:

    Have one of these. Didn’t need it until I got it, now I can’t live without it.

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