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I know this stuff is available from a variety of sources, but I always pick it up from Harbor Freight because it’s seriously, seriously cheap.  Like $3.50 for an 18″ x 72″ piece — and that’s not even on sale.

I always pick up a little extra when it goes on sale — I paid $1 per 18″ x 72″ piece last time — and stick it in storage because I always seem to be adding some kind of tool box/cart/etc. to our collection here.  The photo above is from our tool cart, which is also highly recommended.  This stuff keeps the tools from sliding around when you roll the cart, and keeps nicer tools from getting scratched up/scratching up the box/cart.

Harbor Freight’s marketing geniuses suggest using it to line your car’s truck.  (What?)  While that’s pretty jackass, it does work well in drawers.  Back when I lived in an apartment I used to use a white version of this in my cabinets — resulting in less broken glasses and plates.

72″ Super Toolmate Non-Slip Pad & Drawer Liner [Harbor Freight]

 

7 Responses to Cheap-Ass Tools: HF’s Toolbox Liner

  1. Toolaremia says:

    This is the same stuff Sears sells rolled-up. I don’t remember the price; it was a few years ago. I put it in my toolchest, and it works well. What I like is that it’s kinda sticky and tools sink into it over time, so they stay put as I open and close the drawers.

  2. olderty says:

    I definitely picked up a bunch the other week. However, it seriously sucks cutting it out to fit in the drawer – at least if you’re a semi-perfectionist like me. What happened was I cut along the pattern to make it as “straight” as possible. They must have had a bad batch, because I ended up with a bunch of rhombuses… Make a good template outta something first, then cut.

  3. Also useful for lining random nooks and crannies like the cubbyholes in your car, so objects put in there won’t leap out in response to modest G forces. You don’t even have to glue the lining in there unless you expect to go off-roading or something.

    Oh, and a hand-sized piece is great for opening jars, in case your manly manliness is not otherwise always up to the task.

    (It’s ’cause you work so hard that your hands are always sweaty! That’s why!)

  4. Lear says:

    I keep a couple of pieces in the kitchen to place under cutting boards to keep them from shifting on the counter.

  5. Mousepads work well for opening jars.

    The toolbox liner you can sometimes find in the shelf-paper section of the store, for cheaper and in a bunch of colors. If you believe form follows function, try white. It’ll get cruddy, but dirty gray is still brighter than black, and the brighter your drawer/box, the easier it is to find your tools.

    That’s why it’s so hard to find things in most toolbags, by the way. Bags themselves aren’t inherently bad, but must of them happen to be flat black photon-eating monsters. Try a canvas toolbag, the difference is remarkable.

  6. @Lear: I have tried that cutting board trick, but once I get some chicken juice on them I tend not to want them around. I guess they might survive a trip through the dishwasher, but I dunno.

  7. Teacher says:

    I buy this stuff at Big Lots. My top chests are only 12″ deep so I get the 14 x72 rolls for 98 cents regular price. Also, I also discovered that the pattern is not square so I use a framing square when I cut it.

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