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mechanix-lightglove.jpg

Lots of products claim to shed light on the task at hand without tying up both of yours —  hanging lights, standing lights, and even lights that clip on to things.  Mechanix offers an even simpler solution: sew the light right into your work glove.

Its batteries are replaceable and it’s got a seven-minute automatic shut-off to keep you from having to replace them too often.  The light and batteries are housed in a waterproof rubber pouch that should keep the light from harm if — perish the thought — you get liquid or goo on the gloves.

The glove portion shares many of the attributes of the original Mechanix glove, like concealed interior seam stitching and a molded TPR (Thermal Plastic Rubber) wrist closure.  It additionally features padded/lined Spandex knuckle and finger panels and a synthetic leather palm to protect against wear.

My only concern is size.  It seems like I’m always trying to put my hands in some small space or another under the hood, and I’m not sure I’m willing to give up even a little bit of clearance.  I also wonder how easy it is to clean grease and gunk off the light.  That said, it looks pretty slick.

Street price begins at $18.

Glove LIght [Mechanix]
Street Pricing [Froogle]

 

3 Responses to Finds: Glove Light

  1. eschoendorff says:

    I have a set of those LED work gloces. Unfortunately, the light doesn’ point exactly where it’s needed. I hardly ever use mine.

  2. Myself says:

    There’s a set of little fingerlights over at MPJA, featured in the weekly specials email. They look cheaply made and essentially disposable, but I bet they’d point where the work is.

    I tried on a pair of these glove lights in the store and was unimpressed. No only does the back of my hand never aim where my fingers are working (it’s sort of physically impossible unless my fingers are outstretched, and it’s hard to use an opposable thumb in that pose!), the gloves weren’t even all that comfortable.

    Now, a light in the palm would have its own problems, but it would at least shine somewhere useful. Perhaps an EL panel? 😉

  3. Old Donn says:

    C’mon guys! Haven’t you ever heard half of something’s better than all of nothing? They’re far from perfect, but in tight spaces or by the side of the road in the dark they do OK.

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