jump to example.com

post-fuegoheader.jpg

Today we’re proud to annouce our “Day 4” winner in the 25 Days of Fuego give away: Logan.

Logan’s project: “As a humble and stereotypically poor college student, I have no money for fancy ‘power’ tools.  In an errort to increase the livable space in my sub-200 sq. ft. dorm room I have started to build lofts for my and my roommate’s beds.  This has quickly morphed into a semester long project of adding what amounts to a second floor to our room.”

Congrats, Logan, and remember: when using power tools in a dorm room (or an apartment in NYC), late night work is deprecated.

If you didn’t win — try again today by posting your winter project (that makes use of the Fuego) as a comment on this post for another chance to win.  (And remember, though you can only win once, you can post projects as often as you’d like.  So, if yours wasn’t selected, don’t be afraid to give us a new take on it — or maybe link in a picture!)

Contest Details [Toolmonger/RIDGID]

P.S. This day’s contest is closed. Look for the next days winner to have another chance to win!

 

16 Responses to 25 Days of Fuego: Day 4 Winner — Another Chance to Win

  1. Rick says:

    My winter project is to begin putting together a workbench / storage device of sorts for my garage. I’m still in the design stage, and have yet to determine what the work surface will be, I’m exploring getting one of those ready made Formica topped counters that come in various lengths at your local Lowe Depot. Also exploring if it would be feasible for me to bend some sort of stainless steel sheets to cover the work surface – with prob plywood beneath.
    In addition to a work surface, I also want to put together some framing underneath where I can store my off-season wheels from my car. I currently have them stacked horizontally on top of each other, but I’d much prefer to have them lined up vertically underneath. I came up with a 2 x 4 cleat that will keep the tires from rolling out.

    I also want to do a shelf unit on one side where I can roll my little Harbor Freight tool chest and Roller seat under when I’m not using them, and use the shelves above for various car parts, etc.

  2. Quentin says:

    I’ve been lusting after completing my shop so that I can start producing (or rather learning how to produce) furniture for my wife.

    I always feel guilty when we buy a little side table, serving tray or corner hutch. Whenever we’re in the store and she sees a table she likes, I always say “I can build that” and then I never do. It’s gotten so bad now that we refer to “I can build that” as the phrase that shall not be spoken!

    So what my shop really needs is a good workbench. A Ridgid Fuego would really help me finally finish that off so I can start building what I promised my wife a long time ago, A headboard for our new bed.

  3. ElSteve says:

    Here is my dream of the ultimate commuter vehicle..a homebuilt hovercraft.

    Link: http://rqriley.com/tri-fly.html
    Bay area traffic near San Francisco is a bear, todays drive to work of 42 miles took me 90 minutes. While crossing the bridge I looked down at all that smooth water and again fantasized about gliding over it at over 65 MPH, freeway traffic and SIG Alerts be damned! Luckily there are plenty of small marinas and boat ramps to launch from and or park at.
    Apparently a lot of folks have built these in there own garages and the hull is a rather straight forward glassed-plywood. A small light circular saw would no doubt be a good addition to the tools needed to complete this beauty.

  4. Thomas says:

    My wife and I recently relocated from a good sized house in Austin, TX to a smaller apartment in Portland, OR so that she could attend law school. Being both creative/hobbiest types and bookworms, we need lots of worktables and bookshelves, but supplying an apartment with anything commercial is both difficult and expensive (living on one income while she’s in school doesn’t help, of course). I’m hoping to build quite a few shelves, a drafting table (for my wife’s art work — she’s not exactly your typical law student) and some planters to go out on our patio.

  5. Gene D. says:

    This weekend, while I was outside unclogging my dryer vent ductwork, I discovered that we have some siding that needs to be replaced. Currently in need of a circular saw, I believe that the Fuego would be the perfect tool for cutting out the old siding. I will be working on a ladder, so a small and light tool would be ideal.

  6. Brent H. says:

    My “winter” project (or some might say “honey-do”) is to get the new closet doors in our house installed. It is really a simple project, that I just keep putting off. For one thing, the track needs cut–just a little to fit in the door opening is just shy of a full 48″. Second, the door opening height, with carpet, makes most doors drag. So…the Fuego would make a good saw (*my* FIRST circular saw–ever) to trim a little off the top and bottom of the bi-fold doors.

  7. Gene says:

    Right before Thanksgiving, I build and installed a rather simple countertop-height island in our kitchen for my wife using a recycled hardwood tabletop. The next phase in the project involves building a partially-enclosed storage area to go underneath the island that will contain both shelves and sliding baskets. I currently only have a table saw, so the Fuego would be perfect for cutting the plywood for this phase of the project. Funds are especially tight this time of year, and the gift of the Fuego would help make this a Merry Christmas for my wife, who would be getting her completed island much earlier than she expected.

  8. I’ve got a deck that still needs the decking trimmed to length. I want to make a treasure box for my 5 year old. But the big project, weather permitting is a new roof for my small house.

    I just discovered the problem this past weekend when it rained — and leaked into my bathroom. I found a patch of sheathing that is soft and needs to be replaced. Yuck. Not the job to do in frozen Iowa, but the Fuego looks like the right tool for the job. I’ll slice out the rotten wood. Sister up some extra framing. Then cut a patch of sheathing to fit.

    When that’s complete, I can make the workbench I’ve been wanting. I’ve saved an old steel door to use as stiffening for the top. I think I’ll still put a layer of plywood on top of that.

    Thanks for your consideration!

  9. JK says:

    This winter I’m planning on building our precious “puppy” (85+ pounds of rott/boxer/chow) a doghouse for those times when Boris refuses to come inside. Being the megalomaniac I am, compounded by the fact that the dog is massive, My plans are more akin to building a small apartment/shed than the normal dog house. Complete with insulation and siding, a nice circ saw will make my numerous cuts (I plan on messing up a lot) go a lot easier!

  10. James says:

    (Sorry about not directly linking to the urls. I tried that yesterday and the day before, but my post ended up in spammers purgatory both times 🙂

    I bought my first house 2 years ago. My first purchase for it was a $130 18V 5 piece combo kit and I’ve been building up my tool collection ever since. Since it’s an old house, there’s quite a bit of work to be done. I’ve been using the (badly) finished basement as a workshop but there were a number of things that annoyed me.

    The partition walls made it difficult to place tools and workstations conveniently and maneuver large workpieces. The carpet made it impossible to keep anything level. The in-ceiling lighting wasn’t bright enough, especially with the dark walls and carpet. Most of the electrical circuits were not grounded. It was a frustrating place to work in.

    Despite that, I built a storage shelf (http://www.funktronics.ca/photos/basement/view_photo?photoid=tn_100_2810.jpg) and my first workbench (http://www.funktronics.ca/photos/basement/view_photo?photoid=tn_100_2805.jpg). My plan is to use that workbench to build a few house projects and, eventually, a better workbench.

    While building the workbench, the state of my workshop drove me nuts. So, over the past couple of weeks I’ve been tearing it apart so I could have a proper basement workshop. I’ve found that it was all worse than I thought. I have pictures at http://www.funktronics.ca/photos/basement. I found that the previous owner built the walls out of whatever wood was laying around and did a very bad job of the electrical. The strangest part was that he glued little wooden blocks to the foundation walls in a grid, then nailed 1/8″ plywood to the blocks. I’m sure that took him *way* longer than if he did it right.

    After removing the carpet and placing my new workbench on the newly flat floor, I found that it wobbles. Let that be a lesson to my fellow newbies: never build anything on carpet. 🙂

    If you look at this photo (http://www.funktronics.ca/photos/basement/view_photo?photoid=tn_100_2802.jpg), you can see the only circular saw I have from my cheap 18V combo kit. You may also notice that I sorely need proper tool storage. Unfortunately, my project priorities are determined by my girlfriend. 🙂

    So here’s my list of winter projects:

    – Properly frame my exterior basement walls, a fine task for a framing saw 🙂

    – Cabinets for the main bathroom

    – Pantry for the kitchen

    – Island for the kitchen

    I’m hoping to sneak a nice rolling tool chest in there. 🙂

  11. James says:

    (I’ve been trying to post this for a couple of days now, but I end up in the moderation queue every time, since I have links to pictures throughout. I’m hoping that leaving only the main url will allow me to post this time. The workbench pictures are on the third page)

    I bought my first house 2 years ago. My first purchase for it was a $130 18V 5 piece combo kit and I’ve been building up my tool collection ever since. Since it’s an old house, there’s quite a bit of work to be done. I’ve been using the (badly) finished basement as a workshop but there were a number of things that annoyed me.

    The partition walls made it difficult to place tools and workstations conveniently and maneuver large workpieces. The carpet made it impossible to keep anything level. The in-ceiling lighting wasn’t bright enough, especially with the dark walls and carpet. Most of the electrical circuits were not grounded. It was a frustrating place to work in.

    Despite that, I built a storage shelf and my first workbench. My plan is to use that workbench to build a few house projects and, eventually, a better workbench.

    While building the workbench, the state of my workshop drove me nuts. So, over the past couple of weeks I’ve been tearing it apart so I could have a proper basement workshop. I’ve found that it was all worse than I thought. I have pictures at http://www.funktronics.ca/photos/basement. I found that the previous owner built the walls out of whatever wood was laying around and did a very bad job of the electrical. The strangest part was that he glued little wooden blocks to the foundation walls in a grid, then nailed 1/8″ plywood to the blocks. I’m sure that took him *way* longer than if he did it right.

    After removing the carpet and placing my new workbench on the newly flat floor, I found that it wobbles. Let that be a lesson to my fellow newbies: never build anything on carpet.

    If you look at one of the photos, you can see the only circular saw I have from my cheap 18V combo kit. You may also notice that I sorely need proper tool storage. Unfortunately, my project priorities are determined by my girlfriend. 🙂

    So here’s my list of winter projects:

    – Properly frame my exterior basement walls, a fine task for a framing saw

    – Cabinets for the main bathroom

    – Pantry for the kitchen

    – Island for the kitchen

    I’m hoping to sneak a nice rolling tool chest in there. 🙂

  12. malcolm lowe says:

    My wife has been on my case for the past year about me building shelves in the basement storage area. With the use of the new Ridgid Fuego 6½” saw, I could finally get them built and get her off my back. Then I could build what I want to build, namely a sauna to sooth my aching back. Please make my wish come true.

  13. James says:

    Now I have to apologise for the double post. 🙂

    Sorry.

  14. Jamey says:

    I need to finish my Canoe. I used a cheap 7 1/4″ circular saw to cut all the pieces for this so far from 2x6x12 lumber. Although I would like a table saw, a lightweight small saw would make the remaining cutting much easier, and maybe help retain all of my fingers.


    http://ajvester.com/Canoe/Site/Canoe%20Building.html

  15. Tim Bock says:

    It seems that a lot of people are looking to build the ultimate workbench.

    Well if you, like me, are in a holding period until you get a new saw and a wife on a sabbatical to her sister’s house for a week before work can begin building. Check this out.

    I found a really surprisingly decent interim work bench at Ikea (yes, Ikea. I know. I was just as surprised as you). It is far, far superior to anything that I have found at Home Depot or OSH or anywhere else. And it’s pretty, to boot.

    The unit that I bought is called a VÄRDE Base Cabinet. It is actually meant to be a kitchen counter surface and thus is topped with a pretty solid hunk of butcher block. It has three substantial drawers and some shelves beneath. I had to use some angle brackets to stiffen up the shelves so that they could hold any number of Fuego saws, but otherwise it is a solid and decent workbench surface — and it only costs $349.00!!!

    Additionally, I picked up the VÄRDE Six Drawer Unit ($299.00) which doubles well for a Craftsman or Husky vertical tool chest. All the drawers are mounted on pretty decent sliders and I have been able to fill them with a lot of weight with no degradation in performance.

    I bolted both units to wall studs in my garage, mounted a drill press on top of the drawer unit, and they make for a really attactive work area. Even my manly ‘non-Ikea approving’ buddies approved.

    Seriously, guys. Check it out. It’s hugely surprising that these are such decent hunks of furniture. I think, just like you guys, that most Ikea stuff basically sucks and I only go there when we have to buy flower pots or napkin rings. But this is really a good substitute for the massive tool bench heaven that I will ultimately get around to building one day.

  16. malcolm says:

    ever build a fence or deck and have scraps of wood left over? Too small too use in another fence or deck but a shame to waste?. I found the solution! I build outdoor coffee tables out of the scraps.

    Simply build a 16″x16″ frame (or any size you choose, based on the size of your scraps) out of 2″x4″s, attach 16″ long 4″x4″s on the inside of the corners for legs, (I use 3½” deck screws) then screw rows of 2x4s on top, with a 1″ overhang. You can also use 2″x6″s for the top if this is what you have left over.

    Run your router around the edges. This project takes about an hour and it sure beats carting treated wood to the dump.

    My friends and neighbors love them and they come in very handy when entertaining.