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I’m not sure how old the Surform Shaver is, but I can’t remember seeing one until recently. Maybe I’ve walked past it hundreds of times in the tool aisles but just noticed it now because I recently used a Surform file.

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The Surform Shaver takes the screen-like Surform blade, cuts it down to 2-1/2″, and curves it. The resulting blade fits into a 7-1/4″ long polypropylene body that can fit into tight spaces. To shave right up to corners, Stanley exposes the teeth on one side of the blade.

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Pricing for the Surform Shaver starts at $3 online. Replacement blades can cost as much as a new Surform Shaver or as little as $14 for 6.

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Surform Shaver [Stanley]
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Although not as precise as Incra’s Protractor, Stanley’s Premium Adjustable Quick Square lets you mark angles in degrees and includes several handy scales for framing a roof. The square functions as a saw guide, a bevel for copying angles, and a protractor.

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A couple of years ago I wrote a post about AO Safety’s WorkTunes, and ever since then I’ve thought about buying a similar pair. Finally after getting sick of swapping ear buds for hearing protection every time I needed to do something noisy, I grabbed a pair of Stanley AM/FM/MP3 Earmuffs from Menards. Here’s the rundown on my experience with them:

Fit

You adjust the size of the headband from both sides of the earmuffs. Each side can travel from the 1 line to one more notch past where it is in the photo, or about 2″. This gives you 4″ of total adjustment. I don’t have a huge head — I wear a size 7-1/4 baseball cap, and I have the earmuffs adjusted to almost full size. If your head is much larger, I’d start to worry about these earmuffs being too small.

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Although the Stanley Fat-Max Extreme Instant-Change Saw System was announced last year, I finally saw it in the wild for the first time at Menards. Stanley also released what seems to be an identical product under their Bostitch brand, which has been on sale online for a while.

We’ve covered a similar replaceable blade handsaw, the Ergo Handsaw System, in the past and our readers seemed underwhelmed. I can’t say I understand the appeal of one handle with many blades myself, especially when you’re really not saving much money over a full saw.

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You thought you were done outfitting your shop — Stanley’s taken a rather mundane staple of the shop, a stacking parts bin, and found a way to make you want to throw out your old bins and buy new ones.  They equipped an 11.5″ deep by 6-3/8″ wide by 5-1/8″ high bin with a sliding cover, not unlike a rolltop desk, and gave it a handle for easy transport.

The sliding cover on the Stock and Carry clicks shut to keep the contents inside and dust and dirt out.  You can sit them on a workbench, hang them from racks, or put them Stanley’s Lock and Stock Organizer.

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What makes this hatchet from Stanley a carpenter’s hatchet? Probably the fact it has a hammer head rather than a flat for striking and a notch in the blade for pulling nails, but it’s still primarily designed for cutting wood and driving stakes.

Forged from one piece of steel and rim-tempered to prevent chipping, this 13″, 28oz. hatchet uses a tuning fork design to dampen vibrations, and the grip is covered with rubber to further cushion your hands.

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Although it looks very much like their brick set, this floor chisel from Stanley has an entirely different purpose. You use a floor chisel, sometimes called an electrician’s bolster, to remove flooring.  The long narrow blade is designed to get between floorboards, cut through tongues, and pry up the loosened boards.

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