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Getting all the teeth lined up on a dado stack is hard enough without worrying about losing shims — that’s why Forrest dado stacks ship with magnetic shims. But you don’t need to buy the Forrest to get these shims; you can buy them separately and they’ll stay stuck to just about any steel blade or chipper.

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Most manufacturers sell adapters so you can use a router or a jigsaw with their saw track, but DeWalt also sells two accessories for their track saws that can both help align the track and be used as a layout tool.

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With the proliferation of oscillating multi-tools, we’ve seen an array of new accessories — but the Dremel Multi-Flex is the most curious yet. Dremel designed the the Multi-Flex bracket, or yoke, to hold a variety of blades and wires for cutting and sanding materials such as wood, metal, and plastic.

The downside to this tool is the same as the old C-arm scroll saws — you don’t get a flat cut, as the yoke swings in an arc. But unlike a scroll saw, you’re holding it in your hand, so maybe you can compensate for this shortcoming.

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Milwaukee just keeps churning out cordless tools: The latest addition to their M18 line is a 5-3/8″ metal circular saw with a 1/8″ to 2″ cutting capacity for electrical, mechanical, plumbing, HVAC, and general construction.

The saw weighs just 5.8 lb. with the battery despite having a stainless steel shoe. It features an impact-resistant window and an LED light so you can actually see what you’re cutting from above the saw. Milwaukee built the saw around a 4-pole frameless motor spinning at 3600 RPM. This setup allows you to make over 200 cuts of 3/4″ EMT on one charge.

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From the how-the-hell-did-we-miss-that-one department, last summer Milwaukee introduced an arbor that you twist to release the hole saw. Forget about un-chucking the arbor to change hole saws; no more knuckle-busting wrenches to loosen the jammed nut holding on the saw — just twist the base of the arbor and the hole saw pops free.

The system does have its limitations. It only works with hole saws up to 1-3/16″, which isn’t large for a hole saw. The arbors are available with 3/8″ or 7/16″ shanks and supposedly work with all hole saws, even non-Milwaukee ones.

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If you’ve ever worked plastic with woodworking tools, you’ve probably noticed that the chips usually melt to the side of the cut, or chip welding as it’s commonly called. Not only does cleaning it up add more work, but you don’t get a nice crisp edge.

I discovered that several of the blades designed to cut plastic without melting all seem to have the same features: They use a modified triple chip grind and the carbide teeth have a -2º hook angle. It turns out this is not a coincidence. Both the moderately priced A.G.E. and the inexpensive Timberline brands are also made by Amana Tool.

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This year I was smart: Rather than let everybody know what stores I usually shop at, I told everybody if they didn’t know what to get me for Christmas, buy me gift cards from Sears. That way I’d be able to stack them to get something good. So Sunday I went and picked up this Freud stacked dado set as my “gift.”

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If a hacksaw is too big, sometimes you can fit a hacksaw blade into the space with a holder. The problem with using a blade holder, though, is that you always end up bending the blade. Sure, you can install the blade so it cuts on the pull stroke, but it still can and will bind on the push stroke. When the blade stops and your hand keeps going, something’s got to give.

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I purchased my DeWalt 12″ miter saw about 10 years ago, and I wouldn’t make the same choice today — I almost certainly would buy a sliding miter saw instead. Back then the choice of sliding miter saws was limited, and they were very expensive. As the title suggests, the other thing I’d do differently is choose a 10″ over a 12″ saw.

It’s not that my DeWalt 12″ it isn’t a good saw; it’s just that I chose it based on a landscaping project I was planning that required cutting a bunch of 4x6s. Rather than trying to figure out my future needs, I weighed too heavily the fact that a 12″ saw could cut a 4×6 with a single cut. I haven’t cut another 4×6 since.

I’ve learned a few things since then and have a few reasons for buying a 10″ saw. Maybe the type of projects you do require a bigger saw (building decks comes to mind), but for the average woodworker/DIYer, the following reasons might be something to consider.

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If you need to slice really big stuff, you need a really big saw. The KASTOmaxcut is a really big bandsaw. Compared to the the person squatting next to it, the blade is thicker most people’s arms and the wheels are almost as wide as a person is high.

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