jump to example.com
Currently viewing the tag: "Metalworking"

tramadol online pharmacy

A radius turning tool lets you make ball shapes or radiused ends on your metal turnings. With the tool you can make convex curves up to 3/4″ in diameter in brass, aluminum steel, or plastic — you just mount the jig on your lathe’s tool post and swing the handle, which rotates the cutting tool in an arc.

valium online no prescription

buy xanax online cod

Continue reading »

buy ambien no rx

Tagged with:
 

Milwaukee just keeps churning out cordless tools: The latest addition to their M18 line is a 5-3/8″ metal circular saw with a 1/8″ to 2″ cutting capacity for electrical, mechanical, plumbing, HVAC, and general construction.

The saw weighs just 5.8 lb. with the battery despite having a stainless steel shoe. It features an impact-resistant window and an LED light so you can actually see what you’re cutting from above the saw. Milwaukee built the saw around a 4-pole frameless motor spinning at 3600 RPM. This setup allows you to make over 200 cuts of 3/4″ EMT on one charge.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

You’re tired of cutting sheet metal by hand, but you don’t want to invest in expensive metal shears. Solution: Grizzly’s inexpensive G9947 rotary shear mounts to your bench top and cuts sheet metal up to 16 ga.

With its 11″ handle, the compact rotary shear only weighs 4 lbs. The roller can be adjusted to make either straight or curved cuts.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Why is the guy in the picture fencing with his lathe? Is he some sort of modern-day Don Quixote with delusions of slaying a swarf-breathing dragon? Okay, so he’s just cleaning the chips from his machine using a chip hook. The guard on the chip hook is there to keep his unprotected hand from getting cut by the sharp shavings.

There are a number of chip hook manufacturers. The best-looking products are from NOGA; they include the NogoGrip handle, are black finished, and can be sold with a detachable “shovel” blade.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

If you need to persuade something into position but you don’t want to damage it, a lead hammer is the tool you need. Sure, a dead blow mallet can do the job, but nothing else can give you the same force-per-size ratio as lead — except possibly depleted uranium, though getting that shipped to your house could be tricky.

American Hammer’s lead hammers are made with a hollow steel shank that ends in a ring shape inside the head. As you use the hammer, the head fuses to the handle so it won’t loosen or break off. The other end of the shank attaches to a solid aluminum cast handle.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Forget figuring out how to secure your workpiece with cumbersome hold-downs. Mount a magnetic chuck to your machine and all you have to do is flip a switch and start working.

Of course you’re limited to working with materials that are attracted to a magnet. In reality that will probably be some sort of steel — does anybody machine nickel? Plus you’ll have to have a flat base for the magnetic chuck to grab.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Ever need to drill through the middle of round stock? Sure, you can use a center finder to find the center at the edge of the stock, but how do you accurately find the center in the middle of the stock? One cool solution would be to use a round bar center finder, like the one from Grizzly pictured above.

To use the tool, you need to chuck the center finder’s 3/8″ shank into a drill press. Then when both of the legs of the Y are resting on the bar stock and the two notches line up, the drill press chuck is directly over the center of the stock.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Step bits can be handy for cutting sheet metal and plastic, but what if you don’t need a standard size hole? These conical “stepless” bits can create holes of any size from 1/8″ to 3/4″. The obvious limitation is if the material is thicker the hole will be tapered, but then again in some situations that might be desirable.

The pictured bits use a two flute design which supposedly cuts faster and smoother.  The 1/4″ hex shanked high-speed steel bits are coated with titanium-nitride to keep them cool.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Eagle Tool Company’s sheet metal installation tool lets you pre-drill holes and drive hex head metal screws without changing bits. They build a hex driver socket into the tip of a sliding barrel, so when the barrel is locked in the forward position you can drive screws and when you twist the barrel and slide it back you can drill.

Eagle Tools hardens the hex drive socket to make it durable and they claim the tool’s quick change shank fits most quick change drivers, which means the shank must be 1/4″ hex. When you break the drill bit, you can buy a kit that comes with three replacement drill bits, an Allen wrench, and three replacement set screws.

Eagle sells installation tools both for 1/4″ and 5/16″hex head screws. I can’t find either tool for sale anywhere on the web and they don’t list retail pricing on the site, but I can confirm I saw the 1/4″ driver on sale at Menards for a little more than $10.

Sheet Metal Installation Tool [Eagle Tool Company]

Sure, you can use a calculator or even your head to find the circumference of a round duct by measuring its diameter, but with the Cooper Tool Tinner’s Circumference Rule all you need to measure is the diameter — the ruler will read the circumference.

The tempered medium-weight steel rule measures in inches by 1/16″ on the top edge and circumference inches by 1/8″ on the bottom edge. The black markings are easy to read, and on the reverse side Cooper has printed relevant formulas and tables for easy reference.

Continue reading »

Tagged with: