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Smart woodworkers know that the less you use your tape measure or rule, the fewer mistakes you make. That’s one good reason to use a bar gauge instead. A bar gauge is simply an adjustable length stick, and Veritas makes some hardware that makes it easy to make your own.

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Another replica of an old Stanley tool, the Kunz #70 Box Scraper is so named because it was primarily used to scrape the labels and painted brands from wooden shipping creates so they could be reused.

Designed to be pulled, the 10″ long scraper pivots around the wooden handle. The 1-7/8″ wide convex blade can be used for rough scraping or removing paint.

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You’re looking at a reproduction of a Stanley #113 compass or circular plane from KUNZ of Germany. A compass plane has a rounded sole for planing curved surfaces. Some compass planes have a fixed sole, but others have an adjustable sole like the one above.

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You may have used an abrasive cleaning stick to clean the gunk out of the abrasive belt on your belt sander, but what do you use to clean the abrasive drum on your drum sander? A giant sheet of abrasive cleaner, of course.

As far I as I can find, there are two options: a 15″ x 20″ sheet of 3/4″ crepe rubber backed with piece of 1/4″ plywood from Highland Woodworking, or a 13″ x 20″ x 1-1/8″ thick cleaning pad from Busy Bee Tools. Run either pad through your drum sander just like you’re sanding a piece of wood. The pad will unclog the abrasive, making it cut better, and prolong its life.

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Whether you’re fulfilling your role-playing fantasies as a drunken dwarf or chopping down the first tree in a suburban stand to make way for the new mini-mall, you need a special axe. Ox-head, or as it’s known in Germany, Ochsenkopf, plates its double-bit felling axe in either silver or gold for all your extra-curricular activities.

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With the pervasiveness of table and miter saws, even in the hobbyist’s workshop, the trusty old handsaw doesn’t see as much use as when it was a staple. Still, most shops have one or two handsaws about, but since they’ve gone from the starting lineup to the minors, they’ll rarely ever be sharpened.

For the shop that still uses a handsaw regularly, it’ll need to be sharpened once in a while. When that time comes, do you just buy a new one, or take a few minutes to sharpen it yourself? With a file, patience, and practice you could probably do an okay job, but you’d more than likely be better off buying a proper saw sharpener like the Eclipse 38 from Spear & Jackson.

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Above are two examples of chairmaker’s travishers. These specialized convex spokeshaves are used to create the final shape of a chair seat after it’s been roughed in with an adz and shaped with a scorp.

The Travisher on the left runs $120 at Highland Woodworking. It has a 3″ wide convex blade and handles which continue along the curve of the blade so you can cut into deep hollows. The one on the right is sold at Classic Hand Tools for £82 or $130. It has a 4.75″ radius and is designed to be pushed by your thumbs. It also has a slot in the top for shavings to exit.

Travisher [Classic Hand Tools]
Travisher [Highland Woodworking]

We’ve all seen magnetic catches on cabinets — you know, the kind where if you pull hard enough you overcome the magnetic force to open the door.  But the bigger the door, the bigger the magnet needed to hold it closed and the harder you have to yank the door to get it open.  Using their switchable magnets, Magswitch has come up with a way to hold doors securely yet let them open easily without having to pull so hard.

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The Gauge-It lets you easily and accurately measure blade height and angle on your table saw.  It compensates for blade teeth to give you accurate measurements, and the spring-loaded armature moves with your blade, indicating the exact angle.

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