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This cast-iron chisel holder from Veritas converts a 1″ beveled edge chisel into a rabbet or shoulder plane. The 1-3/8″ wide by 5-1/2″ long by 2-1/2″ high chisel holder grips the chisel at a 45º angle with a solid brass thumbscrew. Once the chisel is properly seated, you can use it to clean up rabbets, tenons, and hinge recesses or cut 1″ wide grooves and dadoes up to 3/8″ deep.

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Made in Canada, the Veritas chisel plane will run you $50 before shipping.

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Chisel Plane [Lee Valley]

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Those clear plastic guards that come with some chisels are way too easy to lose. Only friction holds them in place and they’re so light, you can’t hear them drop to the floor and bounce under the bench — and you’ll never spot them before the vacuum gets them. And sure they may protect the chisel edge from a few bumps, but how much protection would they actually provide if you dropped the chisel?

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There comes a time when you realize that using your regular chisels on large timbers is a fruitless endeavor. While a 1″ blade might cut a notch in 4×8 timber in a few hours, you might as well try to cut down a redwood with a dovetail saw — although you probably wouldn’t get very far before the park rangers detained you anyway.

Slicks, on the other hand, are made for the task of framing with large wood. One of the largest types of chisel, the slick’s wide blade with the long flat back makes quicker work of large notches. Not meant to be struck, the slick’s long handle gives you the leverage to shear curls of wood with just the motion of your body and arms.

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M-Power, the company that brought us such products as the Perfect Butt, the Tri-Scribe, and the Precision Sharpening System, now brings us chisels with replaceable tips from Sheffield, UK. This isn’t the first time these chisels have been covered — The Woodworking Magazine blog actually covered them several weeks ago, but now you can actually purchase them online.

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Although it looks very much like their brick set, this floor chisel from Stanley has an entirely different purpose. You use a floor chisel, sometimes called an electrician’s bolster, to remove flooring.  The long narrow blade is designed to get between floorboards, cut through tongues, and pry up the loosened boards.

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