jump to example.com
Currently viewing the category: "Amazon"

tramadol online pharmacy

From the (virtual) mail bin: “Have you seen or used the one-handed reciprocating saw? Home Depot and Lowe’s both have one, and I was wondering how well they work.” Indeed we have. Read on for details.

valium online no prescription

buy xanax online cod

Continue reading »

buy ambien no rx

 

If you’re worried that someone might steal your license plate, Amazon offers a $5 solution to the problem in the form of specialty fasteners. They’re designed to make your plate just a little harder to steal than the one on the car next to you. I came across this while spinning around Amazon looking at tools, and I’ll admit my first thought was “Really? These are necessary?” Apparently so, at least if you believe the review comments. Check out the first one in which “psnorb” shares his experience of having his plates stolen and promptly used in a high-speed chase with police. (Interestingly, his biggest gripe is that the police kept his plate as evidence.) I have no idea where “psnorb” lives, but I’m guessing it’s not here in Dallas, TX.

Continue reading »

 

In case you haven’t noticed already: Fiskars makes a number of pretty slick-designed tools beyond scissors. From what we can tell, their MO is to update classic cutting tools with a liberal dose of modern design and materials. Consider their X7 hatchet, pictured above. On the surface it looks like a MOMA interpretation of the one that’s probably kicking around your shop right now. But peel away some of the fiberglass, and it’s pretty clear that (in classic modern design style) its appearance is totally driven by its functionality.

Continue reading »

 

I was a bit surprised to find Snap-On products — albeit “tourist” stuff like flashlights and beer coozies — at the local Costco. But I was even more surprised to find Snap-On as one of the brands touted among the Father’s Day deals on Amazon. As you might imagine, I clicked through. My first find? The screwdrivers you see pictured above, an 8-piece set carrying the “Snap-on Industrial Brand JH Williams” name… and retailing for right around $50.

Continue reading »

 

I may write for the web, but I collect things in print. Lots of things. Craptons, actually. I have more books than some small-town bookstores. Sadly, most of them are in a big pile in my spare bedroom keeping me from using said spare bedroom for anything except raw book storage. I’ve intended to build some nice bookcases for years, but the truth is I just don’t have the time. (Not only do I write here and elsewhere, but I also work full time and am a recently-returned full-time student.)

So recently I decided to just find the cheapest shelf brackets possible, screw ‘em to the studs in my family room, cut and tung-oil up some cheap-ass shelves, and convert a 15′ section of wall into 10′ tall book storage. Shelves are easy, but the trick to keeping this whole project within my pretty much non-existent budget is finding the cheapest shelf brackets known to man.

Continue reading »

 

For years we kept our household Christmas tree in the box it came in. I dragged that damn box up stairs, down stairs, around the house, through the truck bed, into the storage unit, and all over the damn place. Then I got one of these: a cheap-ass bag that holds up shockingly well for the price. It’s ringing up for $12 right now at Amazon, and it’s worth every penny.

You might be thinking exactly what I did the first time I saw it: It’s gonna fall to pieces the first time it catches on the edge of the attic door. Incredibly, it didn’t, for me at least. What you can’t see in the pictures is the fact that the bag is reinforced with some stringy material embedded within the plastic. It looks almost like strapping tape, and it’s just as durable. I was careful with it last year, but this year I just drug it downstairs and didn’t worry about it. Still, no tears.

Continue reading »

 

Milwaukee continues its hand tool releases with the pliers you see above, which they call “6-in-1 combination and long nose pliers.” That’s a mouthful of words, yeah? According to the press release, Milwaukee says these will replace three separate tools: a metal de-burring tool, a wire stripper, and needle nose pliers — a combination of tools familiar to anyone doing electrical work.

So let’s see if we can identify all those components. The needle nose pliers are pretty clear, and they look pretty sturdy with lots of detail machining. The wire strippers are embedded into the pliers’ jaws, and you’ll get slightly different capabilities in each of Milwaukee’s two models: the “combination” pliers (pictured, I think) handle 10-18 gauge solid and 12-20 gauge stranded wire with #6-32 and #8-32 bolt cutters. The “long nose pliers” model handles 10-14 gauge solid and 12-16 gauge stranded.

Continue reading »

 

This month, Sears began selling Craftsman tools through Costco club outlets, including hand tools, power tools, and tool storage units. It’s not the first time the company has sold its products through potential competitors — K-Mart picked up Craftsman products after the companies merged*, and Orchard Supply Hardware in California, Fastenal retail outlets, and AAFES all carry Craftsman. Even a number of ACE Hardware stores recently started carrying the line.

Sears is reaching out essentially to one of its own major competitors — Sears Holdings is ranked #10 on the National Retail Foundations’s Top 100 Retailers list. Competitors Home Depot (#5 on the list) and Lowe’s (#8) still don’t cross streams with Sears, but Costco’s in the top ten, too, at #6, doing almost double the retail sales in the U.S. and worldwide last year. And now, by the end of the year, all 430 Costco outlets will carry the Craftsman line.

Continue reading »

 

When you really need to hit the off switch, will you be able to find it? With a paddle-style safety switch like the one above, you won’t need to waste precious seconds searching — you just bump it with the nearest knee, elbow, or other close body part to turn off the machine.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

More often than not, the place you need to put your ladder is uneven — most of the outdoors just isn’t as flat and even as a parking lot. Some ladders have adjustable feet, but often you have to cope with a shaky situation any way you can.

The BaseMate ladder stabilizer provides a solid platform for most aluminum, fiberglass, and wood extension ladders.  It’s a hardened steel arch with two “Easy Connect” arms that clamp to the bottom rung of the ladder whether it’s 12″ or 44″ wide. It’ll support up to 1,200 lbs. and is weight-tested to type 1A USA and Grade 1 CDN ladder requirements.

Continue reading »

Tagged with: