jump to example.com
Currently viewing the category: "RIDGID"

tramadol online pharmacy

From the (virtual) mail bin: “Have you seen or used the one-handed reciprocating saw? Home Depot and Lowe’s both have one, and I was wondering how well they work.” Indeed we have. Read on for details.

valium online no prescription

buy xanax online cod

Continue reading »

buy ambien no rx

 

Our compressor test has finally come to a close, and here are the results. We looked at all manner of compressor tools and tests and found what we consider to be some truths and untruths about what’s handy and what is scrap. To be honest, we didn’t find any flaming bags of poo in our test, just some compressors built for different kinds of jobs and a few we didn’t really get along with for one reason or another.

Performance

As you might expect, performance testing was largely a matter of looking at the numbers. The more CFM the tool required, the more challenging it was to keep up using low CFM compressors. So an 18-gauge brad nailer might go 50 brads before it needs to cut in on a 4.2 CFM compressor, where something like the CH got somewhere around 12 brads. Did both do the job? In a word, yes.

However, there was a large difference in how fast the tank refilled and how quiet it was while doing so. Compressors like the Bosch and Makita would only kick in for a few seconds — the DeWalt and Hitachi for around 20 seconds and something like the CH would go chugging on for a full minute or so.

There was also the matter of what you were going to be doing with the compressor. For instance, intermittent or continuous tools will make a large difference in what compressor you use and how well it works. Intermittent tools like 18 gauge nailers running at 90 psi (or even framing guns) might be fine for lower CFM rigs or compressors that have a cut out of 130 or 165. This is because you aren’t using it all at once and the motor can catch up to your use by replacing pressure when you’re lining up the next shots.

But when we hooked up an air-powered drill (continuous) with a CFM rating of around 6.5, the results were, well, not good. A few seconds of pulling the trigger and every one of the tested machines was pedaling at top speed to keep up. Eventually they all spun down into gasping out whatever the pump would push. The lesson: Don’t use continuous tools higher than the CFM rating of the compressor, or they won’t perform like they should.

So to better understand where machines that seem similar on the outside really start to differ, we put up a few baseline numbers.

Continue reading »

 

Shop air compressors are very much like the heater in your home: If it’s working, you really don’t pay it much attention. Only recently when we had a hiccup with our five-gallon Ridgid twin-stack did the thought even come up that this was a 5-year old unit that had put in hundreds of hours of tireless service. We decided to see how our favorite old compressor does against a field of modern competitors.

We shopped around until we found a good representative product from several manufacturers. The rules were pretty simple: Each unit had to be available at a home center or gear equivalent, needed to be in the 2-to-5 gallon range, and finally had to be able to power the shop tools we put into circulation on a regular basis such as trim guns, air blowers, and so forth. Four challengers to the Ridgid arrived in the shop for test. They are, in manufacturer’s alphabetical order: Bosch CET4-20, Campbell Hausfeld FP2602, Hitachi EC 89, and Makita MAC2400.

Continue reading »

 

The 5-gallon Twin-Stack Ridgid compressor in the shop has been pushing nails and powering tools for the last three-and-change years without so much as a second thought. Though it took a little longer to fill the tank in the last few weeks it’s been as solid as can be — until yesterday.

Because it’s cold out, I had the door closed. This meant that all the dust I was making cutting miters right above the compressor started settling around  and on the compressor. This normally isn’t an issue since I get a brush and broom and sweep it all outside or into the collection bin. Did I mention it was cold? So I just kept going without sweeping and knocking the dust off.

Continue reading »

 

That’s right: Everyone needs a shop vacuum. If you have one, you know what I mean. They’re perfect for collecting dust from under toolboxes, vacuuming up broken glass in the kitchen, and pretty much picking up anything you don’t want to touch. They also make a killer gift — especially when you can snag a decent one for $30.

Continue reading »

 

Ridgid designed this ONESTOP wrench to be the only wrench you need to install angle and straight stops, faucet nuts, washer/dryer/dishwasher legs, compression couplings, and other fittings. Actually, it’s two separate wrenches — the flare-style wrench stores in the open-end handle.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Ridgid’s engineers asked themselves “What’s the biggest pain in the ass about small compressors?” Their answer: Carrying it onto the jobsite. And they have a point. Though the units we employ to power small nailers are pretty light compared to older models, they’re still not light, especially when you sling all the weight from one arm. So they split the compressor in half, dividing and balancing the load. You can carry the motor and one small tank in one hand and the other two larger tanks in the other.

Continue reading »

 

For every Arthur there is an Excalibur — together they create the seamless integration of human and machine that heralds the fulcrum of change. It could be anything, really; for Wyatt Earp it was the Buntline Special, Indiana Jones never left home without his whip, and for Eddie Rickenbacker it was the SPAD S.XIII. Everyone’s got one, even if they don’t know what it is exactly. After careful thought, mine is the 18ga. pneumatic brad nailer. It’s the weapon of choice in my shop, so it seemed only natural that I host a small test of nailers and see how they stack up to each other.

To that end, for the last few months we’ve been testing five models of 18ga nailers in the shop against the rigors normally associated with shop use. Then, for a little extra kick, each was loaned out to a rougher environment like a trim carpenter crew, cabinet shop or furniture repair retailer for a few weeks. Once each came back from the field, we compiled and compared the data.

Continue reading »

 

It’s not every day you need to cut a tailpiece extension to length while you’re under the sink, unless you’re a plumber. When you’re on your back under a cabinet sharing the space with nasty gunk, bugs, or other unidentifiable objects the homeowner left under there, you want to get out as soon as possible.

In comes the P-TEC 2550 — it can create a clean and straight cut on the thin-walled pipe used for sink tailpiece extensions in as few as six rotations. It works on polyethylene, polypropylene, and PVC both 1-1/4″ and 1-1/2″ OD. Plus, while it’s cutting it automatically deburrs and bevels the pipe.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Magswitch takes two Magswitches and mounts them to a couple of right-angle plates to make their BoomerAngle Adjustable Switchable Magnetic Welding Angle. They sell two versions of the BoomerAngle: an 8″ model sporting two 30mm Magswitches with 155 lbs. of breakaway force each and a 10″ model with two 50mm Magswitches, each having a breakaway force of 550 lbs.

Continue reading »

Tagged with: