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From the (virtual) mail bin: “Have you seen or used the one-handed reciprocating saw? Home Depot and Lowe’s both have one, and I was wondering how well they work.” Indeed we have. Read on for details.

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If Bosch was looking for a way to further solidify its brand ethos, it picked a heck of a good line with the Dodge Ram. Ram’s stark and powerful Super Bowl ad taps deep into the heart of the relentless labor, the rugged existence, and the humility of the American farmer — drawing straight from the agricultural traditions of Jefferson and Crevecoeur. Love it or hate it, the Ram ad makes a strong statement, and Bosch is now linked to them with their new partnership.

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Rockwell is set to offer a 16V lithium-ion line, starting with a drill and an impact driver. Why should we care? Well, a few years back Bosch kickstarted the compact market with the PS20, reminding us that a) we don’t necessarily need to use the biggest possible drill for every job and b) small doesn’t have to mean crappy. Then both Bosch and DeWalt took a page from the less-is-more book in their 18V lines, cutting back on the extra bulk to produce svelte, light, yet still quite powerful general-use pro-line drills. DeWalt has even filled in the gap between Bosch’s compact PS series and the new compact 18V tools — the 12V MAX line features more standard form factors than the PS tools (along with larger size), and, in some cases, a little more power.

Rockwell argues that their new 16V series fits in the tiny gap between 12V models — they claim their 16V offers more power — and 18V class tools, which Rockwell suggests are bulkier than their product. How will it hold up? Read on after the jump to find out.

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We’re always fascinated by how different folks store their tools. Some people love the purpose-made hard cases which come with a lot of hand tools, though we’ve seen a pretty solid shift toward preferring the soft case (or slightly-structured bag). Each has benefits: the hard cases offer more protection and can Tetris together into squarish storage spaces better, while soft bags pack much tighter internally — but are messy to stack. It looks to us like Bosch is trying to cut the middle with their LBOXX system, which consists of hard cases of fixed width and depth that stack easily and lock together for ease of storage/carrying.

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Cutting oddly-shaped crown molding on a miter saw is always a little tricky. Besides holding it firmly in place, you also need to make sure you’ve got the molding properly registered against the saw so that the compound angle you painstakingly calculated and dialed in on the saw transfers to the molding — and your walls. One solution, at least for those of you who own Bosch’s axial glide saw, is a crown-specific stop kit.

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We received a press release a little while back announcing the 10-year anniversary of Bosch’s RapidRepair service, a “network of over 700 service locations throughout the US, making it easy and convenient for Bosch customers” to get their tools repaired. Bosch defines “easy and convenient” as a five-day turn time.┬áPlease note that we’re not making fun of the RapidRepair service. Honestly, this isn’t that much different from what you’ll find from most other pro tool manufacturers, and it’s not exactly breaking news. But it did get us thinking about how exactly various return and repair policies work and how they affect the buyer.

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Though we suspect many pros already know about this, we wonder how many high-end DIY folks are aware that most of the major manufacturers offer automotive versions of their charging systems. Indeed, if you take the time to do a little Googling, you’ll discover lots of options regardless of the color of your power tools. Read on to take a closer look at four of them.

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With this latest update, Bosch continues down the path set for cordless SDS gear over the past couple of years: lighter, more runtime, and improved ergonomics. As is often the case, the improvements are more evolutionary than revolutionary, but over time these changes add up to significant improvements. Let’s take a look under the hood.

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Though a lot of people we’ve talked to don’t like the PS10 form factor — many seem happier with the drill-like PS20 pistol-grip style — I’ve always been a huge fan. The Bosch PS10 is hands down the best tool I’ve found for general light assembly and disassembly around the house and shop. For example, I used mine to quickly remove and re-drive about 30 machine screws to re-organize some 19″ rack mount gear in my studio. What makes the PS10 so great, IMO, is that the combination of its straight/90-degree shape and a trustworthy electronic clutch with soft-start — the trifecta for tasks like the ones I described above.

Admittedly, I’ve never really desired a drill-type chuck on the PS10, even though it does bear a strong physical resemblance to any number of small right-angle drills. But adding a chuck to the PS20 did wonders for its general usefulness. Does the same hold true of the PS11?

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So Bosch now offers not just one but two different masonry bit designs: Bulldog bits, designed for fast drilling through light-to-normal weight concrete, and now also a tougher line targeted for use in “reinforced concrete or harsh aggregate.” They call it the Bulldog Xtreme.

Cheesy X-name aside, this bit sounds like it has some design pedegree. For example, the new bit features a solid-head carbide design, which Bosch claims helps it drill more quickly through nasty stuff (like rebar) while wearing down less at the same time as compared to other carbide-tipped bits. And Bosch utilizes a variety of manufacturing technologies to make the Xtreme, too, including a “proprietary diffusion-bonding technology” and a “high-heat, high-pressure solid state welding process” to keep the bits’ carbide and steel in one piece.

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