jump to example.com
Currently viewing the category: "How-To"

tramadol online pharmacy

Shortly after moving into my current house in 2003, I looked years ahead in the calendar and saw event after event that we’d be hosting at our home. These events ranged from garage sales to graduation parties to neighborhood events to perhaps even The Father of the Bride’s worst nightmare — our daughter’s wedding. Each of those events were going to require signs directing people to our house. So instead of buying flimsy little metal wire signs that blow down with the slightest gust or relying on poster-board that disintegrates with the lightest drizzle, like any good Toolmonger I decided to construct them myself. They’ve turned out to be incredibly useful over the years, so as I was pulling them out of the garage this week for yet another event I thought I’d share them. valium online no prescription

Continue reading »

buy xanax online cod

buy ambien no rx
Tagged with:
 

One of the most common repairs that find their way into the shop is leg repair on small tables. Small pegs, glue, and a few screws holding on the legs are usually sufficient for years of service. But inevitably the day comes when someone kicks a leg out, and you’re left with a three-legged dilemma. This table is such a case. Here’s how we fixed it.

When the joint gave way, two things happened – a piece near the joint snapped a bit of wood off at the screw, and the opposing screw ripped out of its seat in the bottom of the table. Queen Ann legs are both beautiful and delicate, but they’re often a bitch to match and replace, so fixing it was the best option.

Continue reading »

 

With all the web sites — OK, I’ve seen two — covering adjustable-height workbenches/tables using scissor jacks and torsion-box construction, it must mean a resurgence of something or other (height? adjustability? scissor jacks? torsion-boxes?). The Jack Bench, shown above and seen on LumberJocks, is a mobile-base, adjustable-height workbench that adjusts from 29″ to 43″ high. Designed by Charlie Kocourek, its telescoping legs are torsion boxes, and the bench is raised and lowered by an ordinary scissors jack. Standard ¾” pipe clamps lock the legs into one solid base unit at the desired height. A second scissors jack raises the bench off the floor and onto its mobile base, allowing the bench to be wheeled around. Charlie has detailed plans available on his web site for $29.95. He also has several videos showing the operation of the Jack Bench.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

So after you’ve converted your garage into a tiny house (TM 4/28/10), you decide that you still want to do some woodworking. If you’ve got a storage space of around 5′ × 5′, you can follow this neat Instructable by steliart from Nicosia — Cyprus, and cleverly craft everything so that it fits in the small storage space. In his case, the storage space was near his open-air parking space. His 59″ × 20″ multi-tool bench, shown above, has five major tools (drill press, sander, jigsaw, circular saw, and router with a lift), a vise, five small drawers, storage space on the bottom, and eight electrical outlets. It rides on five casters with brakes. The angled cut on the left corner above is to allow room to get into the storage space when the bench is inside it.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Back in December I posted about the crib I was making for my young’n. Just after that a time warp occurred that I am just coming out of now. However, one of the projects I did mange to work to completion is my daughter’s shiny new crib. Let me begin by saying anyone who tells you building a crib is a piece of cake is either a liar or selling something. I had lots of issues, but in the end it came out great. So, without further delay, here’s part 2 of the crib build and how it went down.

Due to other time-sucks that happened outside of the shop I wasn’t able to document this project as well as we normally would, but I’ll hit the highlights and low points.

In the last post I left off after just having built the major sections for the end pieces. Now it was time to start assembling them. I needed several things from these ends. Not only would the entire rest of the crib be built to hook to these pieces, but I would need them to look good and provide a mechanical lock as well as a hardware lock in order to feel good about youngster sleeping in it. So as I do with many problems, I solved this issue with 3/4 trim.

Continue reading »

 

I’ll admit that I have a real problem with those who consider knowing about cars a “manly” pursuit. So you’ll have to forgive the name of the blog (“The Art of Manliness”) over at which I found this great article. But it’s a great article indeed, outlining and even explaining a lot of concepts dear to those of us who’ve owned and self-repaired more than one heavily used vehicle. Best of all it doesn’t make blanket recommendations, but rather offers advantages and disadvantages to most of the actions involved in the whole used car purchase process.

My favorite bit, though, is the part most people skip entirely when buying a used car: the inspection. The folks over at Manliness recommend you at least look under the car for rust, check tire wear (which can uncover alignment and suspension problems), look for body damage, and avoid cars with jacked up interiors. After all, anyone who doesn’t give a damn about the part of the car they sit in for three or four years probably gives less of a damn about maintenance or avoiding curbs.

Continue reading »

 

As promised in my earlier post about the RacorPro HeavyLift, I finally installed one in my garage, and will now report on how it went. The picture* above shows the unit attached to my garage’s ceiling (that’s not a mini-bike hanging from the lift: that’s my mountain bike near the far wall of the garage hanging from its own lift, a Harken Hoister).

The installation went reasonably well. It’s a one-man job, as long as you take your time, study a few things, and basically work around the somewhat confusing instructions.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

If you sign up (i.e., give them your email address), you can get “free weekly e-tips” from the editors of Woodsmith and ShopNotes magazines. The e-tips will include how-to videos, handy shop tips, and news about “featured products” — you weren’t expecting all this without an ad or two, were you? Based on the sample I saw (see link below), the web site allows you to select and preview either the tip of the week, the video of the week, or the featured products, so you don’t appear to be locked into looking at everything.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

We’re pretty big fans of the BBC’s awesome show Top Gear around the Toolmonger offices, so when I needed some quick and cheap seating for my game room I passed up the furniture store and headed straight to the junkyard. $75 and an afternoon with the welder netted me a quick facsimile of the chairs the Top Gear hosts sit in during their news segment each week — and left me plenty of cash for beer.

Continue reading »

 

Spring has officially sprung here in Texas, and even if your hometown’s still under the Groundhog’s curse for a few more weeks, you’re probably considering replacing those nasty, wintrified heating and a/c filters in your home. Realizing that waking up every day with a stuffy nose may be due to my crap-clogged filters, I hit the big box on a mission. Unfortunately when I got there and saw 300 varieties of air filters ranging from “high performance electrostatic” ($$$$) to fiberglass ($), I realized I needed some guidance. Here’s what I learned.

To make sure you’re selecting the appropriate kind of air filter for your home, consider whether any pollutants (indoors, in your garage/shop, or outdoors) are affecting the air quality inside. Household chemicals, pesticides, mold or mildew, high humidity, improperly vented appliances, standing water or leaks, or (obviously) if anyone smokes inside the house are factors that can be identified and fixed first.

Second, assuming your home filters are designed more for providing healthy air in the living space (as opposed to protecting machines or equipment), take into account how you or your family responds to allergens such as dust mites, pollen, mold spores, smoke, pet dander, and smog. The better quality the filter, the smaller the particles it can capture, and without interrupting the air flow of your HVAC system too much, which is paramount for efficiency. Also, check the MERV (Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value) of the filter: they range from 1-16, and the 12-16 range are the highest quality at 90+% efficiency.

Home air filters are divided into six basic types:

Continue reading »