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For me, mixing paint is an action that involves an old screwdriver or a scrap of wood. The Mixing Mate paint lid claims to simplify the process of mixing paint or stain in the can: it combines a one-quart paint can lid with the properties of a coffee grinder and one of the maple syrup dispensers from IHOP.

The Mixing Mate seems to work well from what I’ve seen, but for some reason I’ve never needed the help getting paint mixed or pouring it into a can or tray. Normally it’s a rite of passage to open up a can, stir it up, then spill paint everywhere before learning to control the can. After the first time it really isn’t an issue anymore. Plus, if you want to switch paint or materials you’ll have to wash the thing off really well or you’ll be making a different color than you thought.

On the whole it looks like it’d work, but so would a screwdriver and 15 seconds with a paint stick.

Mixing Mate [Rockler]
Street Pricing
[Google Shopping]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

 

There are a few choke points to be aware of when tackling a home painting gig. Among them are picking the right paint, doing correct prep work, and covering the walls well. Somewhere between gobbing paint on the wall and cleaning up comes the part that separates the pros from the noobs: edges. Black & Decker thinks their new EasyEdge powered paint edger will help blur the line between you and a pro, so to speak.

The EasyEdge injects paint into a tube and pushes it through the foam paint pad at the head in an evenly distributed manner. An edge on either side keeps the paint in a neat line. A knob at the bottom controls the effective flow, and the trigger lets the paint loose by pushing the plunger.

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I’ve chosen PVC pipe for lots of projects because it’s easy to work with — and easy to modify. But the only finish option I ever attempted was paint, which really doesn’t hold up that well. One of the readers over at Make posted a how-to, though, on dying PVC. And it sounds like a much better solution, penetrating below the surface of the PVC and creating a lasting hue.

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Scrapers work well for removing glue, paint, and other finishes, but not every surface is flat. For cleaning up curved surfaces, a scraper that can accept blades with different curved profiles would come in handy.

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Safety has never been my middle name — everyone knows this. For better or worse, I tend to be more wary of the obvious things that mangle/hurt/kill me quickly than the equally-dangerous slow ones. For instance, a rotary tool near my face spinning at 35,000 rpm warrants a face shield. But for slow-moving risks such as lead paint, Kett is building tools like the KSV-432 to try to reign in the danger and keep the EPA happy as well.

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One of the keys to effective scraping is to keep your scraper sharp, but according to Ele Grisgsby, teaching people how to properly sharpen their scraper is futile. So he invented the Ol Bastard scraper and jig.

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I’ve been addicted to the Woodsculpting show on DIY for the last few weeks. After a few episodes I decided that I would try my hand at carving something myself, so I did what I always do in such cases — I went to my dad’s place. He always has something interesting lying about and this case was no exception. I returned home with a knurly stick with the intention of making a cane or short walking stick.

I have never carved wood before. A soap dog in Cub Scouts and some clay modeling experience were the only things in my past to give any kind of direction. Soap, of course, carves nothing like wood, and clay is an additive process which was the exact reverse of what I was going to do. But dad said you can’t screw this up; the wood will tell you what’s under there and you’ll know what to do.

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If you saw a picture of this tool, would you be able to guess what it was? Even knowing that Hyde called it a painter’s door stand, I couldn’t figure out how it was used until I read the description on Amazon.  You attach the $4 door stand to the hinge mortises of two doors and it holds both doors upright at what looks to be a right angle to each other so you can finish all sides of the two doors.

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Put the present down, and back away from the tree. From Inspector Bots via Gizmodo comes this unmanned ground vehicle (UGV), complete with a wireless barrel-cam mounted on its Mil-Sim A5 Paintball gun. The barrel-cam is a low-lux color camera with night vision (“You can see up to 35 ft. in total darkness!”). This 4WD UGV, which can go more than 50 mph, is teleoperated with first person view (FPV) where you control the vehicle as though you were in it. In addition to paintballs, the weapons system can also fire pepperballs and hardened rubber rounds — those will leave a mark — with a range up to 250 feet or more. It’s designed for law enforcement personnel for applications like riot control, tactical SWAT, hostage situations, and surveillance, but I think it would be a great addition to the garage or shop, and handy to have around if Sean shows up to borrow some tools.

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We’ve previously written about Painter’s Pyramids made by K&M of VA, Inc.  Now they’ve incorporated twelve of their pyramids into a 16″ rotating table to make a finishing turntable.

Six pyramids ride on a rail around the circumference of the table and six more ride on rails that run from the center to the edge. This arrangement allows you to arrange the pyramids to match the bottom of most work pieces. The three-pound table can support up to 100 lbs.

The Finishing Turntable retails for about $50, but you can pick it up on sale at Hartville Tool for $45, plus $9 shipping of course.

The Finishing Turntable [Corporate Site]
The Finishing Turntable [Hartville Tool]
The Finishing Turntable [Rockler]

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