jump to example.com
Currently viewing the category: "Measuring"

The FatMax magnetic tape honestly looks like a normal FatMax with a magnet clipped to the hook — but sporting a $22 price tag instead of the $8 you’d find with the standard leverlock. However, as with many Stanley tape products, the benefits of the magnetic tape are a little more subtle than might first be expected.

Continue reading »

 

It’s hard enough to tell how deep you’re drilling with rotary hammers when you’re drilling downward or sideways, but drilling overhead makes it even more difficult. Try “feeling” your way to a perfect depth while your arms burn like mad. DeWalt claims to feel your pain, which is why they just launched a depth control system — you know, to remove the guesswork. The cap you see in the picture above mounts to the bit and serves as a stop to keep you from over-drilling. You can adjust its size by twisting it then locking it in place. Seems pretty simple.

Continue reading »

 

Ah, the inspection camera. It’s like an unwritten law; you can put this tool in a room with 30 guys and every one of them has the same thought at the same time: “Let’s put this camera somewhere it’s not supposed to go.” At the Milwaukee event they actually had a toilet there for us to snake so we didn’t have to bother dragging it to one. Fun and games aside, the 2313-21 inspection camera is a serious bit of gear — and it’s now armed with a 360 degree rotating screen.

Continue reading »

 

First and foremost, this product from M-Power looks like a pretty serious try square. We definitely appreciate its laser-etched light-on-dark measurement markers, which’ll be easy to read in full sunlight or shade, as well as its seemingly sturdy powdercoated aluminum construction. And its extended saddle appears to indeed make it easier for you to mark points over curved molding, like you see in the inset above. But we’re not so sure about the “marking gauge.” Is it really that hard to hold a golf pencil?

Continue reading »

 

We’re always fascinated when we see assumptions about tools being challenged — like tape measure markings. M-power suggests that the current markings on tapes we all use aren’t accurate because you’re most likely right-handed.

90% of the population are right handed yet most are using left-handed tape measures when marking – why? M.POWER’s R1 tape measure is the right way round. Hold it in your left hand and mark the measurement with your right hand, saving time and improving accuracy on the job. Look at any other tape measure and you’ll see what we mean. (the measurements will be printed upside down)

We find this pretty entertaining. Not only have we never had any issue scribing a mark, our tape increment lines on the tapes we use in the shop run the width of the tape itself so there’s no trouble, you know, at all. Also, 50 percent of the people in our shop are left-handed so there’s that.

It’s not a bad idea, but how many folks really need a tape with inverted numbers and markings? Are we off in left field on this one?

R1 Tape [M Power]
Street Pricing [Google Products]

 

The press release for Bosch’s new GLM 80 laser distance measurer lists a ton of features, like the fact that it’s lithium-ion powered, that it has an automatic backlit display, and that it plugs into an accessory to become a digital level. But what you really want to know about it is that it payed a lot more attention in geometry class than you did. That plus a built-in inclinometer means that it can perform 90-degree height measurements with just one laser sight. Or it can give you the height of, say, a distant window without you being level with the bottom of it. Just point it at the top, click, point it at the bottom, click, and you get the height.

In 90-degree mode, you can shoot any point on a wall and the GLM 80 backs into the 90-degree measurement based on the straight-line distance and an assumed 90-degree angle. No more shooting once at (hopefully) 90-degrees and again at your measure point. It’s a big time-saver, and seems more accurate than putting the device on the floor.

Continue reading »

 

There are certain truths that cannot be ignored. 1. Grown men getting knocked in the nads is funny, 2. Small, fluffy things can sell almost anything, and 3. If you make a temperature finder that looks like a gun and has a laser on it you can entertain a group of middle-aged men for quite some time. Once again, damn you, Milwaukee engineers!

The 2265-20 Laser Temp-Gun is powered by 3 AA batteries and is rated for a temp range of –22F to 662F with a distance-to-spot ratio of 10 to 1. Just point and pull the trigger and the temp gun will tell you the surface temperature of anything you’re likely to find around the house or jobsite unless you’re a fireman or something really extreme. Plus, it’s uber-addicting.

Continue reading »

 

Need a quick way to check that your scroll or band saw table is set at the right angle? These plastic Accu-Angle gauges are a fast and easy way to set or verify the angle of the table to the blade.

The set of eight gauges measures angles from 0 to 7.5º in 0.5º steps. Each gauge measures two different angles. The whole set will run you $13 before shipping.

Accu-Angle [Woodcraft]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

Tagged with:
 

Most manufacturers sell adapters so you can use a router or a jigsaw with their saw track, but DeWalt also sells two accessories for their track saws that can both help align the track and be used as a layout tool.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Extruded aluminum track has become a popular addition on machine tables and fences because of its versatility — a variety of accessories like hold downs, stop blocks, and guides can be attached with simple T-bolts.

Incra takes the track to another level. Their fence system gives you precise and repeatable positioning by eliminating one source of human error: lining up stop blocks with a scale. Rather than depend on your eye, they incorporate a 32TPI rack in their track and stop block for measurement-free positioning.

Continue reading »

Tagged with: