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Whether you created the emergency with the P.O.G.O. Pry Bar in the first place or the cause was totally unrelated, the P.O.G.O Pry Bar can help you shut off the gas before the situation gets any worse.

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BRW intended the pry bar to be used in search-and-rescue applications — P.O.G.O. actually stands for Pry Off, Gas Off. The fact that it looks like a pry bar anybody might have in the toolbox just means that it’s a pretty useful design in a number of situations.

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The Etón Scorpion is a multi-purpose, solar-powered, digital weather radio rugged-ized for outdoor use. While you may not need one in the workshop, it could come in handy in a go-kit or in your vehicles for emergencies.

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As a volunteer with the local county’s CERT*, I’m always on the lookout for safety items and search-and-rescue tools that can help in emergencies — plus it gives me an excuse to look at and buy stuff for my truck. This Rugged Ridge kit is aimed at the 4×4 crowd, but it could also be useful to the less off-road user. The kit contains a 2″×30′ 20,000 lb. recovery strap, a 3″×6′ 30,000 lb. tree trunk protector strap, a 20,000 lb. snatch block pulley, two heavy-duty 9,500 lb. D-rings, a winch line damper, a pair of leather gloves, and a storage bag. It’s available online for as low as $70.

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Gizmodo reports that CRKT® has a new tool for getting out of your car in emergencies. The ExiTool™ combines a seatbelt cutter, a window breaker, and an LED flashlight in one unit that clips onto any standard seatbelt. It’s like a ResQMe (see TM 9/29/07 and 9/28/08) with an LED, but may be more convenient because it’s right there on the seatbelt.

This tool’s seatbelt cutter is designed so that “it’s virtually impossible for even the smallest fingers to accidentally reach the blade,” which is razor-sharp high-carbon stainless steel able to cut seatbelts with a quick pull. The tungsten carbide breaker point is designed to shatter tempered glass side windows, and the LED is powered by a single CR2032 lithium battery.

The ExiTool™ is expected to retail for $26.99, and will be “Coming Soon in 2010.”

What do you think? Would you pick one up for each of your vehicles?

ExiTool™ [Manufacturer's Site]

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Few things in woodworking are more satisfying than making a perfect paper-thin shaving with a well-maintained plane. If you’re using a spill plane you’re actually trying to make special shavings called spills rather than trimming wood from a work piece. A spill is a long coiled wood shaving that was used to transfer flame, such as from fireplace to candles, before the advent of matches. Before finding this spill plane from Lee Valley, as far as I was aware, you either had to buy an antique spill plane or make one yourself.

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A worthwhile addition to your vehicle’s emergency kit and safer than incendiary flares, the small (6 oz. with batteries; 4 1/4″L × 3 7/8″W × 1″D) Lite Flare has a clear high-impact polycarbonate housing, two high-intensity red (yellow is available, also) LEDs that flash about 55 times per minute with a claimed visibility range of 1 mile at night, and uses two AA batteries that will operate for “400+ hours (alkaline type).” A 3-pack (the recommended number for “optimum” visibility) costs $33. They also make a Cone Flare version that fits in the top of a traffic cone to make it more visible.

If you don’t like the directionality of the Lite Flare, other manufacturers (e.g., PowerFlare) make LED flares that emit light in all directions.

I’m sure there are even more options out there. What do you prefer for road-side emergencies?

Lite Flare [Manufacturer's Site]
Street Pricing [Google Products]

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When you practice catch-and-release, every second counts. The longer you have the fish out of water, the worse its chances of survival. You grab your forceps or other hook-remover only to figure out there’s no way you’re getting the hook out without damaging the fish. So you need to waste precious seconds to grab another tool to cut the line. If you were holding a pair of Hemocuts, you’d already have the fish back in the water.

The Hemocut is a combination of the Kelly forceps and bandage scissors. It’s marketed by two different companies for two entirely different fields. EMI manufactures and markets the Hemocuts to the medical field and William Joseph markets them to fisherman, including a few modifications like an open-finger loop and a rubber coating for a better grip in wet conditions.

The medical Hemocuts start at $6, while the ones specialized for fishing run $15.

William Joseph [Corporate Site]
HemoCut [The Fire Store]
Street Pricing
[Google Products]
Via Amazon [What’s This?]

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Unlike many fire starters, the BlastMatch from Ultimate Survival Technologies allows you to start fires using only one hand.  You might not think this is an important feature until you’re alone in the wilderness with an injured hand.

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Wildfires leave destruction in their wake, but you can protect all your hard work with a little insurance — Barricade fire gel.  You mix the gel with water from your garden hose, then spray it on your house and even your lawn to create an encapsulated wet blanket that’ll block fire for up to 24 hours.

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Ever wonder how divers can patch a hole in a ship in the water?  One way is the Hilti UW10.  This gun can seal a 15mm plate to the side of a ship to stop it from taking on too much water, saving both cargo and lives.

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