jump to example.com
Currently viewing the category: "Finishes"

tramadol online pharmacy

Scrapers work well for removing glue, paint, and other finishes, but not every surface is flat. For cleaning up curved surfaces, a scraper that can accept blades with different curved profiles would come in handy.

valium online no prescription

buy xanax online cod

Continue reading »

buy ambien no rx

Tagged with:
 

If you want to match the finish of a particular piece of furniture, the Finisher’s Colorwheel will help you get close, even if you know nothing about matching color.

To find the right mixture, turn the inside wheel and look for the closest color to appear in one of the windows. The color wheel will tell you how to mix the color using standard liquid dyes, powder dyes, or liquid stains in the following colors: white, raw umber, french yellow ochre, burnt sienna, cordovan, burnt umber, raw sienna, black, yellow, green, red, and orange.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

I’ve been addicted to the Woodsculpting show on DIY for the last few weeks. After a few episodes I decided that I would try my hand at carving something myself, so I did what I always do in such cases — I went to my dad’s place. He always has something interesting lying about and this case was no exception. I returned home with a knurly stick with the intention of making a cane or short walking stick.

I have never carved wood before. A soap dog in Cub Scouts and some clay modeling experience were the only things in my past to give any kind of direction. Soap, of course, carves nothing like wood, and clay is an additive process which was the exact reverse of what I was going to do. But dad said you can’t screw this up; the wood will tell you what’s under there and you’ll know what to do.

Continue reading »

 

If you like the look of distressed furniture and you don’t have any kids around to destroy it for you naturally, you can pick up this distressing tool kit from Varathane. The kit includes a worm holing tool for mimicking insect holes and a distressing tool for making dents and divots in the furniture.

Right now it looks like the kit is only available from Woodcraft and they’ll charge you $25 before shipping, but frankly you could probably save some money by using a scratch awl to simulate insect holes and string some old nuts, washers, and wing nut onto a length of wire to make the dents and divots.

Distressing Tool Kit [Woodcraft]

Tagged with:
 

Not one wood project completed in my shop in the last year has been called “done” without a coat or two of Watco Danish oil. We’ve written about its ease of application and wide spread availability, but the real gem here is the way projects look after you’re done.

When we first heard about this wipe-on finish that doesn’t streak and leaves no splotches, we thought folks were giving us a hard time. To our constant surprise we find it’s simple and relatively cheap to stain with and comes out looking like colors you might find at the local furniture store. I have personally done dozens of furniture projects and tried every color available, and I can honestly say that there isn’t a dud among them. Just wipe it on and let it dry. It really is that simple.

Each project winds up looking just like the pictures on the can and, with a little poly and wax over it, is good enough to put next to anything in the house and not radiate that special “I did this myself” vibe.

Continue reading »

 

This dartboard cabinet and board has lived at my parents’ house since I was two. It’s had a hard life and the last 10 years spent in my father’s garage didn’t do it any favors either. So it was time for a little restoration and rebuild.

Continue reading »

 

A day spent sanding is a day spent in hell. Unfortunately I like my projects to come out looking good. Over the last few years we’ve spent hours upon hours “in the grit.” Gator products are normally what get stuck to the bottom of the sander or wrapped around a block. One of Gator’s newest creations is the Ultra Power paper with Black Zirconium.

Continue reading »

 

Make your paint and other finishes last longer with a two-second blast of Bloxygen before you seal the container. The heavier-than-air, pure argon sinks to the surface of the liquid and displaces oxygen, which can cause the finish to cure in the can. As a result you’ll have less skinning, thickening, and spoiling.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

If you’re planning to make cutting boards, bowls, spoons, or any other project that’s going to come into contact with food, you don’t want to finish it with stain and polyurethane.  Instead you need to use a food-safe alternative like Behlen’s Salad Bowl Finish.

Continue reading »

 

A good finish is as important to a furniture project as its construction. You’d be surprised how much trouble that statement has gotten me into over the last few years, but it happens to be true.  The first reaction I get to it is, “Not every project needs a finish,” and that’s also absolutely true — however, that particular statement is often the battle cry of the lazy.

Continue reading »