jump to example.com
Currently viewing the category: "Fasteners"

Until January 24, 2010, Lee Valley has an introductory price of $13.50 (the regular price will be $18.50) for the Thread I.D.™ Nut and Bolt Indentifier*. It includes a plate with 28 tapped holes: 10 National Coarse (1-64 to 1/4-20), 10 National Fine (1-72 to 1/4-28), and 8 Metric Coarse (M1.6 to M6.0) that you can use to identify bolts, as shown in the far right picture below. But wait, there’s more: it also comes with knurled-head bolts in the same 28 sizes, so, as shown in the far left picture below, you can use these to identify tapped-hole threads in other materials, and, by flipping the plate over, as shown in the middle picture below, use them to identify nuts. Last, but not least, all this comes in a fitted wooden box.

tramadol online pharmacy

I’ve seen a variety of bolt and nut sizers/identifiers, but this is the first combo kit I’ve come across, and I think it looks like a handy addition to the toolbox. What’s your opinion?

valium online no prescription

*Made, as you can see in the picture, by Chestnut Tools. However, their web site redirects you the to Lee Valley site.

buy xanax online cod

Thread I.D.™ [Lee Valley]

buy ambien no rx

I’ve been postponing hanging some family pictures for a while — OK, it’s been years; happy now? — but recent “suggestions” from my patient but persistent wife prompted me to actually do something. Naturally, the first thing I did — in order to procrastinate further — was to check the web to see if I had all the necessary stuff. One site (TM 11/11/07) — our favorite — had a reference to a nice tutorial. I also ran across the Hangman Products site and noticed they have several items relevant to my pending project, plus a neat motto (Hang It Level Every Time®).

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Unused hog rings kinda look like rounded staples. When you squeeze them with hog ringer pliers they form a ring capturing whatever happens to be in the center. They’re used in all sorts of applications, like fencing, landscaping, mattress and automobile seat construction, and even holding sausage casings closed.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This weekend I read a thread on the Practical Machinist forum asking what size hole to drill for a given diameter of spring pin (which we often call a roll pin). I never gave it much thought, but it turns out to be a pretty simple answer: drill the hole of the nominal size of the spring pin (and in many cases up to a few thousandths over), so for a 1/8″ spring pin, a 1/8″ diameter hole. I decided to poke around and of course Machinery’s Handbook has all the data for both slotted and spiral spring pins.

Continue reading »

 

You Toolmongers have been holding out on me. How come no one told me — or, perhaps worse, why didn’t I discover before — that there are simple formulas for determining the nominal diameters and clearance holes of (Unified Thread Standard) machine screw sizes 0–14*? All those years I spent looking up that little table, or trying to find that plastic gauge thingy…

Continue reading »

Lex’s recent post on captive nuts reminded me of some other nuts I’ve been using a lot lately while doing some volunteer work on a search-and-rescue van: nylon-insert hex nuts. Depending on which big box you shop at, and whom you ask when there, they’re also called stop nuts, locknuts, or nyloks (although NYLOK® is a nylon material typically applied to bolts and screws), or nylocks. I like them because they resist vibration and loosening, they’re reusable, they don’t damage threads, and they’re readily available. McMaster-Carr has a large variety in their catalog, and many of the big boxes carry Hillman versions.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

I’ve been a stapling fool the past few years, stapling everything from small animal fencing and shooting targets to home repair projects, using my standard array of manual staplers from major manufacturers. The problem is, as I get older, pulling the stapler trigger or handle gets rough on the old hands — so I’m taking a look at the Arrow CT50K battery-operated stapler.

Continue reading »

 

I don’t know how woodworkers do it. A good quality clamp will run you $30 to $60 per clamp — yet most committed woodworkers have a wall of 20 to 50+ clamps. That money would buy me the cabinet saw I’ve been looking at, and I feel lucky to own the half-dozen bar clamps that I do have. This R&R Stackable Clamp System at my local Woodworks caught my eye, and it looks like a good deal — but unfortunately it’s still out of my budget.

Continue reading »

 

Another cool idea from FastCap, the Blind Nail System allows you to hold stuff together without any visible fasteners.  They could replace a small clamp, holding small parts while the glue sets — all kinds of applications with molding and casework come to mind as well. Whatever you do with ‘em, you’re saving yourself work in the future by not having to fill nail holes or plug screw holes.

Continue reading »

 

I thought Velcro — or more generically, hook-and-loop fasteners — only came in adhesive-backed styles, but then I ran into these Velcro rolls at work, where we use ‘em for cable management.  The hooks are on one side of the roll and the loops are on the other.  I may be the last Toolmonger to come across these little round gems, but I thought I’d pass ‘em along just in case.

Continue reading »